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You’ve seen the Salt Lake City mural with the faces of people killed by Utah police. Here are their stories.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Faces from a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City.

The mural started with George Floyd, the Black man whose slow death was captured on camera as a white Minneapolis police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes.

The video catalyzed a movement against police violence, inspiring marches and mass demonstrations across the U.S. and near-daily protests in Salt Lake City, despite a deadly pandemic.

It also brought together a group of anonymous artists who painted an image of Floyd’s face, in pink and red hues, on the fleet building at the corner of 800 South and 300 West, where Salt Lake City stores official vehicles.

Artists then added Bernardo Palacios-Carbajal, fatally shot May 23 by Salt Lake City police, and have continued to memorialize some of the other Utahns killed by police, and Breonna Taylor, who was fatally shot by Louisville police officers. The artists’ goal is for people to remember these names and to see them as human beings, beyond any interactions they had with police. Here are the people behind those portraits:

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Bernardo Palacios-Carbajal appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Bernardo Palacios-Carbajal

Family and friends have described Bernardo Palacios-Carbajal, 22, as an artist, someone who cared about his community and was vocal about injustice and police violence. He was beloved by family, especially his young niece and nephew. The 3-year-old nephew tells his mother he can still see Palacios-Carbajal and talks to him.

“So, we know he’s here right now,” said Alysha Perez, Palacios-Carbajal’s sister-in-law. “We know that he feels us. We know that he knows we’re supporting him.”

Killed: May 23, 2020

What happened: Salt Lake City police were called to a hotel near 300 W. 900 South on a report of an armed robbery. They found Palacios-Carbajal there and told him to show his hands. He ran, and police chased him for blocks. They continued yelling at Palacios-Carbajal to “drop it” or show his hands, and he stumbled repeatedly, dropping a gun he was carrying and picking it back up each time. Police fired at him more than 30 times.

[READ MORE: Bernardo Palacios-Carbajal’s family members reflect on the summer of protest and quiet moments in the year since Palacios-Carbajal was killed.]

His death, two days before Floyd’s, has spurred ongoing protests in Salt Lake City, where protesters marched and painted the street outside the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office red to demand charges for the involved officers. After prosecutors announced Thursday those police would not be charged, protesters came out again, painting the street red and breaking out three windows at the district attorney’s office.

Outcome: Ruled legally justified by Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Darrien Hunt appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Darrien Hunt

At his funeral, a friend remembered Darrien Hunt as a gentle soul who felt the hurt in the world so acutely that his goal in life was to heal it. Hunt, 22, was a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints who loved music and enjoyed time outdoors, his friends said.

His friend Duane Domino told the more than 100 who came to Hunt’s memorial, “He was kind and he was gentle and loving, and he hurt for the pains of the world. Am I talking about Christ or am I talking about Darrien? If you don’t know, that’s the point.”

Killed: Sept. 10, 2014

What happened: Two people called 911 to report a man walking with a sword. Saratoga Springs police found Hunt standing near a convenience store near Redwood Road and State Road 73. Hunt told the officer he needed a ride to Orem. Cpl. Matt Schauerhamer said he’d give him a ride, but said Hunt couldn’t bring the samurai-style sword strapped to his back with him inside the patrol car.

Schauerhamer later said that Hunt got violent after that, and didn’t want to give up the sword. Schauerhamer and others at the scene said that Hunt unsheathed the sword and swung it Schauerhamer. Schauerhamer and Officer Nicholas Judson fired at Hunt, who ran away. Schauerhamer followed, ultimately shooting Hunt six times in the back, killing him.

Hunt’s mother, Susan, filed a civil rights lawsuit against Saratoga Springs, alleging police killed him, in part, because Hunt was black. It resulted in a $900,000 settlement and a gag order, which Susan Hunt has tried to get thrown out.

Outcome: Ruled justified by the Utah County Attorney’s Office

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Dillon Taylor appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Dillon Taylor

In his obituary, family described 20-year-old Dillon Taylor as always joking, the type of person whose infectious smile would “literally light up a room” and who could “pick you up on your lowest days.” In the days before his death, when a warrant for his arrest was issued, Taylor expressed a sense of doom about the idea of going back to jail.

Taylor’s family held a vigil for him seven years after he died at the mural.

“For me, I mourn every day. Every morning [when] I wake up, every night [when] I go to bed, I mourn him and I miss him,” friend Josh Siege said. “Life’s never been the same.”

Killed: Aug. 11, 2014

What happened: Police were called to a 7-Eleven near 2100 South and State Street in Salt Lake City for a report of a person with a gun and saw Taylor outside. Officers approached Taylor, guns drawn, and Officer Bron Cruz shot Taylor after Taylor did not respond to Cruz’ orders to put his hands up and instead reached into his pants and lifted his shirt. Taylor was not armed and was wearing earbuds when he was shot. Taylor’s family has said he likely was listening to music and could not hear the officer’s orders.

Taylor’s brother and cousin reached an $85,000 settlement with police because they were detained for several hours during and after the shooting. A federal lawsuit filed on behalf of Taylor’s family was dismissed in May 2019.

Killed two days after Michael Brown was fatally shot in Ferguson, Taylor’s death sparked protests in Salt Lake City.

Outcome: Ruled justified by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Bryan Pena Valencia appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Bryan Pena-Valencia

Bryan Pena Valencia was described as ambitious and charismatic. Those who “were lucky enough to ever cross paths with him” knew his contagious humor, according to a fundraiser for his funeral. He left behind a young son.

Mario Herrera, Pena-Valencia’s cousin, said the family is still grappling with Bryan’s death. His son, Luciano, is especially struggling.

“We believe in justice. We believe that officers are not bad people, OK? They’re not here to hurt anybody, OK? We all know that,” Herrera said. “In this case, we feel there is a lack of training.”

Killed: March 21, 2020

What happened: Unified police were called to investigate a report of shots fired near the 6000 block of S. 3200 West. They saw a car and tried to stop it, but the motorist kept driving. The car crashed soon after, and the driver, Bryan Pena Valencia, got out of the car and tried to run away.

The officers — Unified officers Omar Flores and Shane Scrivner — followed him into a backyard. Flores said in a written statement that Pena-Valencia kept reaching for his waistband, and Flores fired at him. Pena-Valencia died. He was unarmed. Prosecutors called the shooting a mistake.

His family has filed a lawsuit, alleging officers shouldn’t have been chasing Pena-Valencia that night, nor should they have shot him.

Outcome: Ruled unjustified by The Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office, but prosecutors did not file charges.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Michael Chad Breinholt appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Michael Chad Breinholt

At the time he was killed, Michael Chad Breinholt was taking classes to become a musical therapist, according to his obituary. He loved music and could play many instruments. He had a big heart, a quick wit and could be the life of a party.

“Those who never knew Chad, or only briefly knew him, may only have seen the challenges he faced in life; but those who had the privilege of truly knowing Chad can only speak to the good-natured character of his soul,” his obituary said.

Killed: Aug. 23, 2019

What happened: West Valley City police were booking Breinholt into jail on suspicion of driving under the influence after he showed up intoxicated at his girlfriend’s workplace. He told his girlfriend, according to police, that’d he had taken a lot of pills “so he’ll die.”

He was in the processing room for more than two hours. At one point, with his hands cuffed behind his back, he grabbed for an officer’s gun. One of the officers, Sgt. Tyler Longman, is heard saying, “You are about to die, my friend” just before he shot Brienholt at pointblank range.

[Read more: New video shows what happened before Sgt. Tyler Longman pulled the trigger and killed Breinholt. This was Longman’s third fatal shooting.]

His mother, Susan Neese, has filed a lawsuit alleging officers “threatened and antagonized” her son before Longman unnecessarily killed him.

Outcome: Ruled justified by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Danielle Willard appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Danielle Willard

Family members called Danielle Willard “Dee Dee.” She had a “gorgeous smile” and a passion for photography.

She initially moved to Utah from Washington to stay in a rehabilitation center, and her mother, Melissa Kennedy, urged the 21-year-old to stay in the state, thinking she’d be safer here. Despite Willard’s struggles with addiction, her family has said, she was generally happy.

Killed: Nov. 2, 2012

What happened: Two West Valley City officers approached Willard, who was sitting in a parked car. Narcotics detective Shaun Cowley and partner Kevin Salmon later said they suspected Willard had bought drugs. Willard tried to leave the lot, and backed up. Both officers fired on her as she reversed, later saying they feared being hit by the car, but others argued the officers weren’t in danger.

Salt Lake County District Attorney Sim Gill said the shooting was unjustified and charged Cowley with manslaughter. After a preliminary hearing, a judge threw out the charge. Cowley was fired for allegedly mishandling evidence in drug cases, but was reinstated with back pay in 2015 after the city did not fight his appeal. Cowley resigned soon after.

Willard’s family received $1.4 million in a settlement with the city in 2015. In the course of reviewing the shooting, investigators discovered systemic problems in the department’s drug unit, leading county and federal prosecutors to dismiss more than 100 drug cases.

Outcome: Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office ruled the shooting not justified and filed charges filed that were later dismissed

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Patrick Harmon appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Patrick Harmon

Just before his death, 50-year-old Patrick Harmon had “found renewed spirituality” and had reconnected with his son and daughter, according to a lawsuit filed on behalf of his family. It added that although he “did not lead a perfect life,” he still “deserved the opportunity to grow with grace.”

A friend described him as a nice man who looked “nerdy” and had a “big, belly laugh.” He wanted a job helping people with drug addiction, something he, too, struggled with, she said.

Killed: Aug. 13, 2017

What happened: Police stopped Harmon for riding his bike across State Street in Salt Lake City without lights. When asked for his name, Harmon first gave a few fake ones, then said there was likely a felony warrant for his arrest. Harmon put his hands behind his back to be cuffed, then took off running. Police say Harmon then turned and pulled out a knife and threatened to stab Officer Clinton Fox, though none of that can be seen on body camera footage. From the moment Harmon runs to when Fox fires the first of three shots, about 5 seconds pass. A knife was found near Harmon’s body.

The Salt Lake County District’s Attorney’s Office asked the FBI to look into the shooting and to review prosecutors’ conclusion not to charge Fox, a decision that spurred protests. An FBI spokeswoman told The Tribune she couldn’t comment, saying, “Per policy, we can’t confirm or deny the existence of investigations.”

Harmon’s children have sued Salt Lake City in federal court, alleging that their father’s race “was a substantial motivating factor” in the shooting. Attorneys for Salt Lake City and Fox have asked a judge to dismiss it.

Outcome: Ruled justified by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Cindreia Europe appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Cindreia Europe

At age 3, Cindreia Europe learned to read, her mother, LaToya Mack said. Europe always excelled academically and had a special interest in science and engineering. But looking back, Mack said, it’s clear her daughter was struggling at home. In 2017, Europe left her Georgia home without a word to her mother and, eventually, arrived in Utah. She spent her days reading and writing, tutoring kids and working at a rehabilitation center. At night, she slept in her car.

As far as Mack knows, her daughter didn’t have any substance abuse issues or a criminal history. She was “just making her way.”

Killed: March 5, 2019

What happened: Europe’s car was impounded from the lot where she normally slept. One night, someone called police to report a person was lying down in that lot near 3300 S. 2300 East in Millcreek. A Unified police officer, Megan Franklin, responded and ran over Europe in the parking lot. Disciplinary records show Franklin had a history of poor driving, and Europe’s family have sued UPD and Franklin.

Outcome: Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office said it couldn’t file charges in the case

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Bobby Duckworth appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Bobby Ray Duckworth

Bobby Ray Duckworth, 26, had a big family and his relatives all loved him very much, his obituary said. He loved them back; family was important to him, it said.

Duckworth also loved the outdoors, especially fishing, camping and riding four-wheelers. He hunted when he was younger, but preferred to just search for antler sheds as he got older.

“Bobby left us much too soon with his many dreams and aspirations never to be told or realized,” it says.

Killed: Sept. 10, 2019

What happened: Someone called police to report a suicidal man near railroad tracks in Wellington. An officer, identified only as Safley, found Duckworth in a field near a fishing pond and the tracks. Duckworth had two knives. Safley tried talking to Duckworth, asking him to drop the knives, body camera footage showed.

He said at one point, “I’m not going to shoot you, if that’s what you want. That’s the last thing we want to do, brother. We want to help you.”

About a minute after that, Duckworth began walking toward Safley, climbing through brush with one of the knives in his hand. Safley told him to drop the knife, adding that he will shoot him, but doesn’t want to. Duckworth kept walking, and Safley fatally shot him. About 30 seconds passed from the time Duckworth started walking toward the officer to when Safley shoots him.

Outcome: Ruled justified by the Carbon County Attorney’s Office

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Zane James appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Zane James

Zane James, 19, was on his way to a professional hockey career when he got yet another concussion and doctors told him he shouldn’t play anymore, due to the risk of even more severe head trauma, his family said.

The teenager was forced to reevaluate his life path at the time when he was being given opioids to treat pain. He became addicted — a revelation that deeply disturbed him, his family has said — and later started using heroin. James tried to beat the illness multiple times.

Shot: May 29, 2018, and died three days later in a hospital.

What happened: Police were searching for someone who had robbed a store in Sandy with an Airsoft gun. Cottonwood Heights officer Casey Davies, who was off duty, heard a radio dispatch about the robbery, and Davies and another officer decided to pursue James, who fit the suspect’s description and also was riding a motorcycle. James also matched the description of the suspect in another armed robbery from earlier that day.

James crashed his motorcycle turning onto a residential street and slid with it until it stopped. He got up to run, and was “limping seriously,” according to a lawsuit filed on behalf of his parents. Davies shot James in the back after James didn’t show his hands. He ended up paralyzed from the neck down and died three days later in a hospital.

[Read more: Why Utah police can be forced to explain a shooting internally, how those interviews can become public and what those internal documents revealed in the Zane James case.]

An amended version of the lawsuit also alleges Davies didn’t have to shoot James and that the department has covered up details of the shooting.

An internal police document obtained by the family shows two discrepancies between the officer’s version of events and how the shooting has been described to media and in court documents. An attorney for the department says there isn’t a cover-up and that there are simple explanations for the discrepancies.

Outcome: Ruled justified by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Allen Nelson appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Allen Nelson

On the day he was killed, Allen Nelson was four days out of jail. Family said the 44-year-old was generally happy and had no known health problems. After his release, he talked about turning his life around.

He left behind a son, according to his obituary.

Killed: June 9, 2012

What happened: Nelson died in police custody after he was pulled over near his uncle’s apartment complex. Police have said someone called them reporting a disturbance. A neighbor said there wasn’t anything happening at the complex when Nelson was pulled over on his bike, and suspected police stopped him because they thought he had stolen it.

Police said they handcuffed Nelson and planned to take him to jail on suspicion of creating a disturbance, but Nelson became agitated and struggled, so they forced him to the ground. The officers noticed Nelson was struggling to breathe and sat Nelson upright, but he stopped breathing when the ambulance arrived and died at the scene.

The family alleged in a lawsuit that police used a Taser on Nelson, amounting to excessive force, and that’s what killed him. It was dismissed in January 2014. Police denied using a Taser.

Outcome: Since Allen’s death wasn’t considered an officer-involved critical incident, the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office didn’t investigate the officers’ conduct. Utah law was later changed and the incident would now be reviewed.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Cody Belgard appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 8, 2020.

Cody Belgard

Marvin Oliveros described his brother, Cody Belgard, as a “teddy bear,” not quick to anger. The 30-year-old was quiet, a musician who used the name See Smoke, and used rhymes and raps to express himself.

Belgard knew life was precious, a family member said, and never missed the chance to give a loved one a hug.

After Cody Belgard died, fans of his music shared “Creep Wit Me,” his homage to the neighborhoods and towns of the Salt Lake Valley.

Killed: Nov. 9, 2018

What happened: Salt Lake City police came into contact with Belgard because they’d been tracking the car he was driving — but looking for someone else. They confronted Belgard and his girlfriend in a parking lot. Belgard allegedly backed a vehicle into a police car and drove away from officers instead of getting out of the car.

Police used a GPS locator on the car to track Belgard to near 800 N. Sir Philip Dr. Officers ordered Belgard to drop to the ground. The grainy video footage appears to show Belgard turning away from police, and Gill said the officers saw him reaching into his clothing and surmised that he was grabbing for a gun. Belgard didn’t have a gun. His family believes what police thought was a firearm was a cellphone.

Belgard’s death prompted demonstrations in Salt Lake City as family and friends demanded accountability in his death. Protesters at one point occupied Mayor Jackie Biskupski’s office for tour hours, demanding a meeting.

Outcome: Ruled justified by Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Siale Angilau appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 29, 2020.

Siale Angilau

A former high school football coach described Siale Angilau as a capable nose guard — but an even better kid.

“He was very likable,” said former East High School coach Aaron Whitehead. “He was very coachable.”

After his death, a hashtag circulated on Twitter to remember him: #RIPSialeAngilau. A family member posted, “Heart is aching and heavy ... in disbelief that I’ve lost my nephew so tragically in so little time.”

Killed: April 21, 2014

What happened: Angilau, a member of the Tongan Crip Gang, or TCG, was set to stand trial on racketeering charges in Salt Lake City’s brand new federal courthouse. Just before 9:30 a.m., a witness began testifying about his life in the gang, when Angilau charged at him with a pen and mechanical pencil. A U.S. Marshal shot him four times, just before Angilau leaped over the witness stand.

Angilau was supposed to be shackled but wasn’t because the new courthouse hadn’t yet received the drapes sometimes used to hide defendants’ restraints from juries, so a judge ordered he not have them.

Outcome: Ruled justified by Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Michael Glad appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 29, 2020.

Michael Glad

Rose Scheuerman remembers her older brother as caring and protective of her. He was also a “huge goofball" and what she described as a “big kid.” He liked video games, especially Minecraft, and joke songs like “The Fox (What Does The Fox Say?)” by Ylvis.

But she said that despite the happy vibe he tried to put off, he always struggled with depression and other mental health issues. Scheuerman said that his mental illness had a role in how he behaved the day he was killed by police.

“I just feel like killing someone that should be the last, last, last, last resort," Scheuerman said, “and I feel like they skipped a bunch of steps.”

Killed: May 28, 2018

What happened: Glad was suspected of robbing a Taylorsville convenience store when an officer stopped him. Glad pointed a gun at the officer and stole his police truck, body camera video showed. Two other West Jordan police officers fired at the truck as Glad tried to drive away, according to a report from prosecutors. Glad died, and officers later discovered that Glad’s gun was a pellet gun.

Outcome: Ruled justified by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) James Barker appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 29, 2020.

James Barker

Those who knew 42-year-old James Barker were shocked when they learned how he died, and plenty of people did know him. Neighbors said he and his girlfriend were always out and about in the Avenues neighborhood, working outside the house or cooking food.

And the Barker they knew was an artistic nature lover, musician and surfer. He volunteered at community arts events and quit his church basketball team because it was “too violent.”

“He was one of [Jack] Kerouac’s bright, burning roman candles,” said Summer Osburn, who met Barker when they were students at Brigham Young University.

Killed: January 8, 2015

What happened: Barker’s girlfriend said she had asked Barker to break up ice that had accumulated around a bus stop near their home that day. He evidently took the snow shovel and walked through the neighborhood, near I Street and 2nd and 3rd avenues.

A neighbor called 911 around 3:30 p.m. to report a suspicious man carrying a shovel and knocking on doors. The caller also said Barker matched the description of someone who on Wednesday was peering into car windows in the neighborhood, police said.

When the officer approached Barker on the porch of another house and started to question him, the two got into an argument. Body camera footage shows that as the officer reaches toward, Barker jumps back and brandishes and swings the shovel at the officers, which police said disabled the camera. The officer said he fired his gun after Barker attacked him and went for his gun.

Outcome: Ruled justified by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office.

(Trent Nelson | The Salt Lake Tribune) Joey Tucker appears on a series of murals depicting people killed by police, near 800 South and 300 West in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, July 29, 2020.

Christopher Joseph “Joey” Tucker

Joey Tucker had a passion for working in the ornamental iron industry and loved the outdoors. He often camped or went four-wheeling with friends and his then-toddler, Devree.

Tucker had his issues with substance use and moodiness, problems his family said were exacerbated when he didn’t properly treat his diabetes, but he was beloved.

“He’s not a criminal by any means,” Tucker’s father, Perry, said. “He had a lot of personality, a lot of love for his family and for his little daughter.”

Killed: Aug. 6, 2009

What happened: Troopers were chasing after Tucker, whose father had called police worried for him because of a medical issue. Tucker was also suspected in two hit-and-run crashes that day. UHP Trooper Lawrence Hopper used a PIT maneuver to bring Tucker’s pickup to a stop on the interstate, the reports state, though the vehicle swerved across the highway and appeared to bounce off a concrete barrier.

Tucker hit the trooper’s car and went backward, turning slightly. A Salt Lake City officer shot three times into the truck, hitting Tucker in the neck and torso, as the vehicle reversed into a concrete barrier, video shows. Tucker died at the scene.

Outcome: Ruled justified by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Andrew "AJ" Jacob Preece, on Monday, May 24, 2021.

Andrew Jacob Preece

Family remembered Andrew Preece as “a good man with a huge heart.” His obituary says, “Our hearts ache without grace, without your energy for life, without your intellect and without your love.”

The same post says that Preece also “had a troubled past” with “struggles not many can understand.”

Preece grappled with substance use and mental health issues, court documents show.

Killed: July 25, 2020

What happened: A grocery story employee called police to report Preece and another man were intoxicated and fighting in the parking lot. The employee said they had been walking around the store with a large knife.

A Salt Lake City officer finds Preece and the man walking on the sidewalk outside the store. The officer tells Preece to drop a long, “Bowie”-style knife, but Preece grabs the other man, pulls him closer and puts the knife to his neck.

Another officer arrives and tells Preece to drop the knife. He doesn’t, and she fired at him. Preece didn’t let go immediately, and both officers fired. Preece died.

Outcome: Ruled justified by Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Troy Burkenshaw mural, on Monday, May 24, 2021.

Troy Burkinshaw

Family wrote in Burkinshaw’s obituary that, “[h]e will be missed more than words can express.” They called him a loving son, brother and friend. Burkinshaw also had two dogs — Buster and Lexie — who he loved.

Killed: Oct. 26, 2012

What happened: Box Elder County Deputy Austin Bowcutt stopped to give Burkinshaw a warning after seeing him urinating near his vehicle, which was stopped on State Route 13 near Corrine. Bowcutt saw a bottle of alcohol in the car and thought Burkinshaw seemed intoxicated.

After the deputy asked him a few questions, Burkinshaw got into his car and drove away. Bowcutt chased him to a dead end road and got out of his patrol car with his gun drawn. Burkinshaw backed up his car, and bumped into Bowcutt as the deputy tried to back away. Bowcutt fired when he felt Burkinshaw rev the car’s engine. Burkinshaw crashed and died at the scene.

The man’s family filed a federal lawsuit alleging the deputy used excessive force and that Burkinshaw was driving less than 3 mph when Bowcutt shot him. The case was dismissed permanently in March 2017.

Outcome: Ruled legally justified by the Box Elder County Attorney’s Office.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Elijah Smith mural, on Monday, May 24, 2021.

Elijah Smith

Friends said Elijah Smith had the best smile. Family members said he was happy and energetic and a talented artist, who loved skateboarding and making music. His obituary says he also enjoyed making people laugh and playing around.

“He was a hard worker and had dreams of being successful and going places in life,” his obituary read.

Killed: April 8, 2018

What happened: West Valley City were searching for someone suspected of stealing from a cell phone store near 3400 South on Redwood Road. They saw Smith, who matched the description of the suspect, jump a fence into someone’s backyard. Smith left that house and went to another house, where a 13-year-old answered the door.

Smith went inside and into the garage, where officers found him and told him to put his hands in the air. They fired as Smith had his left hand up and abruptly pulled his right hand out and back into to his waistband-area. Smith died. Officers found a screwdriver in his pocket.

Outcome: Ruled legally justified by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Nicolas Sanchez mural, on Monday, May 24, 2021.

Nicolas Sanchez

Nicolas Sanchez was a problem-solver, according to his obituary.

“[W]hich brought a lot of drama into his life, but he couldn’t live any other way,” the obituary read.

It added that he made friends where ever he went, and loved fishing, boating, being in the mountains. He also raised chickens and had “contagious” smile and laugh.

“His voice carried as a trumpet that made everyone aware he was there so they would all come out to gather around him and listen to his funny comments and stories,” the obituary read.

Killed: Feb. 21, 2017

What happened: Roy police were called to a convenience store at 1900 West and about 4400 South after someone reported Sanchez was loitering and “acting suspiciously.”

The officers arrive and ask Sanchez to move away from the store’s doorway and come talk to them. As they are walking away, Sanchez reached into his pocket and an officer said to keep his hands visible. Sanchez pulled his hand out of his pocket and lifted his sweatshirt saying, “I don’t have nothing.” Video shows a handgun in his waistband.

Sanchez backed away and ran when one of the officers tried to grab him. That officer tackled Sanchez, knocking the gun out of his pants. The other officer picked it up and shot Sanchez with it. Sanchez, who had no other weapons on him, died.

Outcome: Ruled legally justified by the Weber County Attorney’s Office.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Hussein Al Rakabi mural, on Monday, May 24, 2021.

Hussein Al-Rekabi

There is not much publicly available information about Al-Rekabi, who came to the U.S. from Iraq as refugee after the Persian Gulf War.

After Al-Rekabi was shot, family members arrived at the scene and were distraught, police documents show, and two of his brothers threatened to kill police for revenge.

Search warrants filed in 2010 for an investigation into drug dealing implicated Al-Rekabi’s brother in a plot to kidnap and torture a police officer. He was ultimately charged with drug-related charges, which were dismissed.

Killed: Jan. 24, 2009

What happened: An officer heard gunshots and people running from a night club in Salt Lake City. He saw Hussein Al-Rekabi walking away quickly. He told Al-Rekabi to stop, but the man got inside a parked white car and drove at the officer, police said.

The officer fired, hitting Al-Rekabi, who crashed into a utility pole and fire hydrant. He died. Police determined Al-Rekabi fired into the night club crowd, hitting two people. Neither died.

Outcome: Ruled legally justified by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Riche Santiago, on Monday, May 24, 2021.

Riche Santiago

Rosa Santiago, Riche’s wife, told ABC4 soon after her husband was killed that she kept expecting him to pop out from behind a corner alive and say his death was just a joke.

“I wish I could bring him back but I can’t…,” Santiago told ABC4. “He was a great person. He was a great father. He was my better half.”

Riche Santiago had recently gotten out of jail and was planning to move back to California to be with his wife and children, ABC4 reported.

“Please don’t tell me I’m going back to jail,” he told officers just before the shooting.

Killed: Aug. 5, 2020

What happened: Police spotted Santiago and others in a car in an apartment parking lot after responding to an accidental 911 call from a child. An officer thought the people in the car may be buying drugs ran the vehicle’s plates and learned it was possibly involved in an earlier shooting at the complex, according to the district attorney’s report.

Police ran Santiago’s information and learned he had an outstanding warrant. Officers told him he was under arrest and Santiago, who was in the backseat, reached for a backpack and pulled out a gun, the report states.

A witness and police officer said Santiago fired at police, and then officers fired into the car. Santiago got out of the car and shot at officers and then fell down. He died.

Investigators said they couldn’t determine if Santiago fired at officer’s before they shot at him.

Outcome: Ruled legally justified by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Harold Robinson mural, on Monday, May 24, 2021.

Harold Robinson

Harold Robinson was named after his father, who died in December 1996, according to his obituary. To differentiate, family members called the younger Robinson “Junior,” .

Robinson was described as intelligent and loving in his obituary. He enjoyed the outdoors and liked cars. He taught himself about the law, science and mechanics.

“Junior cared very deeply for his family and always wanted nothing more than to protect them. Junior was a very loving man, like a big teddy bear.

A few months before his death, Robinson seemed unstable, his family said in a statement, but recently seemed calmer. Family told prosecutors that Robinson seemed “agitated” and “anxious” when he left their house the morning he died. He said he was going on a “long drive” to calm down.

Killed: April 8, 2019

What happened: Robinson, who was experiencing some kind of mental health issues, left home in Duchesne that Monday morning in a white pickup truck. He later robbed three stores — firing gunshots at two of the stores — in Salt Lake County. Then Robinson, drove to downtown Salt Lake City and fired his gun randomly.

911 calls flooded into police, who chased Robinson south on State Street after he fired at car dealerships near Salt Lake City Hall. The chase ended when Robinson crashed into Princess Alterations at 3339 S. State St.

Officers from Salt Lake City, Unified and the Utah Highway Patrol opened fire, killing Robinson. The 15 officers fired nearly 200 times.

The alterations store owner Thaer Mahdi filed a federal lawsuit against the three police agencies who fired on Robinson and at his store. The suit was dismissed in July, but Madhi has appealed to the 10th Circuit Court.

Outcome: Ruled legally justified by the Salt Lake County District Attorney’s Office.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Jovany Mercado-Bedolla mural, on Monday, May 24, 2021.

Jovany Mercado

Ruby Mercado described her brother as a talented artist and a music lover. Growing up, she said the two were “glued at the hip.”

Mercado, who was killed the day after his 26th birthday, left behind a wife, two children and one stepchild.

The family has said that Mercado was diagnosed with schizophrenia.

“Jovany was the friendliest person to anybody he ran across,” an online memorial for Mercado said. “He had a very big heart and a good soul. He was an amazing dad to his three kids and we will never forget the impact he made on our lives.”

Killed: Aug. 16, 2019

What happened: A neighbor called police on an August night in 2019 to report a man, later identified as Jovany Mercado, had arrived at his party and was acting strange. Mercado was having a mental health episode that night.

Police found Mercado at his home, hiding behind cars in the carport. He walked slowly toward officers and held a knife in his hand, video shows. The officers told him to drop the knife, but he doesn’t. Four officers fired on Mercado when he reached a gap in a chainlink fence at the end of the carport.

Mercado’s family has filed a lawsuit against the officers, saying they used excessive force. It’s still pending.

Outcome: Ruled justified by the Weber County Attorney’s Office.

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Correction Aug. 24, 9 a.m. >> An earlier version of this story misidentified Christopher Joseph “Joey” Tucker’s father. His name is Perry.

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