With 2018 safely behind us, we have an opportunity to test how closely you were paying attention to the wild and crazy events that unfolded with the annual year-in-review quiz. (Answers to the questions appear at the bottom).

UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 11: Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, speaks with Roll Call in his office on Dec. 11, 2018, as he prepares to depart the U.S. Senate. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call) (CQ Roll Call via AP Images)

A. Releasing a new album with Kanye West — “Beep! Boop! America, Yeah!”

B. Changing genders

C. Voldemort

D. Lost

(Scott Sommerdorf | The Salt Lake Tribune) Rep. Jon Stanard, R-St. George, in the Utah House of Representatives, Wednesday, January 28, 2015.

A. It was the first time a Republican lawmaker had willingly hired a woman for any job.

B. The Legislature is better known for screwing voters.

C. The mental image made the entire state cringe in unison, measuring 4.4 on the Richter scale.

(Rick Egan | The Salt Lake Tribune) Mitt Romney gives his victory speech, at the Romney Headquarters, in Orem, on election night, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2018.

3. Also in February, Mitt Romney filed to run for the U.S. Senate. What was the biggest challenge Mitt faced?

A. Having his mail forwarded to Utah.

B. Finding a perfect pair of “man of the people” blue jeans that still cost at least $200.

C. Packing the “Romney for Senate” buttons left over from his Massachusetts campaign into his carpet bag.

D. Downloading all of the software updates needed to reprogram Romney to interact with Utah voters.

(Keith Johnson | Special to The Tribune) President Russell M. Nelson speaks during the concluding session of the 188th Semiannual General Conference of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on Oct. 7, 2018, in Salt Lake City.

4. Throughout the year, Russell M. Nelson, the new president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, made sweeping changes to the faith’s practices. What was his most controversial change?

A. Allowing chokeholds during church basketball games.

B. Letting young men use a confetti cannon to pass the sacrament.

C. Insisting members refer to him as “the hunky one.”

FILE - In this Sept. 27, 2018, file photo, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh testifies before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kavanaugh's statement during his testimony, "I liked beer. I still like beer." is No. 2 on a Yale Law School librarian's list of the most notable quotes of 2018. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, Pool, File)

5. In September, the Senate Judiciary Committee held confirmation hearings for Brett Kavanaugh even as he faced allegations of sexual assault. Why did Utah Sens. Mike Lee and Hatch support Kavanaugh?

A. Lee was convinced that nobody who takes notes with a Sharpie could be a bad man.

B. Kavanaugh was the most qualified unstable beer-swilling rage-aholic nominated to the court since at least Sandra Day O’Connor, maybe even William Howard Taft.

C. They were afraid of what Kavanaugh might do if they didn’t vote for him.

D. They were really hoping he would invite them to take part in a Devil’s Triangle. (You know, the drinking game.)

(Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) Homeowners who were not allowed to return to their homes and onlookers waited near Herriman Cove pond to watch as a firefighting helicopter refilled. A 50-acre wildfire in Rose Canyon was threatened about a half-dozen homes Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. A spokesman for Unified Fire said the blaze has already burned a few structures, including outhouses and sheds. Firefighters have evacuated around 20 to 30 homes in two neighborhoods near 15555 S. Rose Canyon Road in Herriman.

6. Throughout the summer, wildfires scorched millions of acres across the West and some 340,000 acres in Utah. U.S. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke dismissed suggestions the increased fire activity was due to global warming. What did Zinke say was to blame?

A. Squirrels cooking meth.

B. Diesel-powered trees.

C. Godless liberal environmentalists.

(Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) State Sen. Jim Dabakis walks through the Utah House chamber with a bowl of candy gummy bears that look similar to marijuana-infused edibles that he offered to fellow legislators. Utah legislators voted to change the Utah Medical Cannabis Act, the bill that officials, Prop 2 opponents and medical marijuana advocates crafted and pitched as a compromise. On Monday, Dec. 2, 2018 during the special session, lawmakers overhauled the medical cannabis distribution system, reduces the number of medical marijuana outlets, prohibits edibles for gelatin cubes instead and changes the list of illnesses that qualify for cannabis treatments.

7. In October, legislators and representatives of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints struck a deal with backers of a medical marijuana initiative to replace the ballot measure with language more palatable to the church. What changes did the church want?

A. Hop-heads may only toke on two doobies of reefer each month.

B. Patients seeking a prescription for medical marijuana must watch a videotape of a stern lecture on the dangers of drugs from the late first lady Nancy Reagan.

C. All medical cannabis prescriptions will be delivered to your door by a pair of extremely chatty missionaries.

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) People cast their votes in the early hours shortly after the polls opened for the midterm elections on Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2018 at First Congregational Church in Salt Lake City.

8. In November, for the first time in state history, voters approved three ballot initiatives, legalizing medical marijuana, expanding health care for low-income Utahns and creating an independent commission to draw political boundaries. Which of the following initiatives were rejected?

A. Proposition 5: A 1 percent sales tax increase to purchase a Trump-style toupee for Lt. Gov. Spencer Cox.

B. Proposition 6: Mandatory subscriptions to The Salt Lake Tribune.

C. Proposition 7: Sen. Daniel Thatcher. Rep. Brian King. Two men enter. One man leaves. Thunderdome!

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Utah Navajo DineŽ BikŽeyah member Willie Grayeyes speaks in opposition to HB136, sponsored by Rep. Mike Noel, R-Kanab, at left, which muzzles city and local officials from speaking out on public-lands protections during the House Natural Resources, Agriculture, and Environment Standing Committee at the Capitol on Tuesday, Feb. 6, 2018.

9. Also in November, San Juan County elected a majority Navajo county commission for the first time in history. How did the sitting white commissioners welcome the new members?

A. With a gift of traditional jewelry looted from an ancient gravesite.

B. Illegally backdating a card congratulating them on their victories.

C. Taking their lands and resources.

(Leah Hogsten | The Salt Lake Tribune) Mia Love, the former two-term republican representative from Utah's 4th Congressional District held a press conference at the Utah Republican Party headquarters, Nov. 26, 2018 to discuss her accomplishments, Washington politics, President Donald Trump and her future. Love was joined at the lecturn with her parents Mary Bourdeau and Jean Maxine Bourdeau, husband Jason, daughter Alessa and son Peyton.

10. Before the 4th District race was even final, President Donald Trump slammed Rep. Mia Love, saying, “Mia Love gave me no love and she lost. Too bad. Sorry about that, Mia.” What was most surprising about Trump’s comment?

A. It marked the first time Trump uttered the word “Sorry” to a woman without it being accompanied by Michael Cohen arranging hush-money and a non-disclosure agreement.

B. He wasn’t sorry. He’s never really sorry.

C. If we observe Trump’s marriage to Melania, “no love” seems to be par for the course.

Answers: Congratulations! You got them all correct. Happy 2019!