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Letter: Utah should embrace the transformations brought by globalization

(Francisco Kjolseth | The Salt Lake Tribune) Clint Betts, Executive Director of the Silicon Slopes Tech Summit in Salt Lake City kicks things off on Wednesday, Oct. 13, 2021.

Utah is quickly finding itself as a crossroad of the world, headquarters to many transnational companies, home to scores of refugees and other international migrants, and now a center for technology and information -- dubbed the Silicon Slopes. Rather than shy away from this identity, buying into arguments of retrenchment and isolation, Utah should embrace this transformation. Building trading relationships in foreign countries, finding friends abroad, and welcoming all those who wish to reestablish themselves here in our beautiful mountain home.

Migrants are a source of so many positive changes to a society. They bring with them rich cultural traditions reminding us of the importance of family and community. Migrants embody much of what we as Americans cherish, such as a strong work ethic with a drive to build success for themselves and those around them. They also have a deep love for the freedoms we too often take for granted, along with the patriotism needed to defend and improve it. By welcoming them we are simply inviting the opportunity to become a stronger state and nation.

When it comes to business, I too often hear how globalization is simply a dark force taking away jobs from the U.S. and giving them to others. While this has truth to it, it fails to address how technology has changed the landscape of the world and our society has evolved into something new, where those honorable blue-collar jobs don’t really have a place. We have moved into a new era of industry where information systems and data management have become incredibly valuable, and Utah is the best at it. Let those jobs go elsewhere (driving down the consumer prices here) and embrace our new specialties and the benefits they bring.

Toronto Ray Eschrich, Riverton

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