Less than a year ago, I wrote a letter to The Salt Lake Tribune pleading with Utah politicians to focus less on anti-porn piety and redirect their efforts toward ending Utah’s rape culture. Yet, here we are again.

State Sen. Todd Weiler recently announced he is considering bringing back Utah’s obscenity and porn complaints ombudsman (also know as the porn czar) at the expense of taxpayers’ money. Though a laughable proposition, the porn czar would reinforce harmful stigmas that hurt sexual assault survivors and Utah youths. Weiler veils his attempts to encroach on Utahns’ First Amendment rights and bodily autonomy by insisting the primary goal is to protect Utah’s teenagers from pornography. But is this the truth?

Weiler’s undying mission to keep Utah youths “pure” may very well be well-intentioned, but it seems disingenuous because it is supported by little to no definitive research. If the goal is truly to stop teenage girls from reading sex and relationship-oriented publications like Cosmopolitan, our politicians would bring a comprehensive sex education bill to the table. Abstinence-focused education has proven to be not only ineffective, but actively detrimental. Utah’s rising rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among teenagers is substantial proof that primary sex education needs to be vastly improved.

Utah’s teenagers deserve better. They deserve to be taught proper sex education, and they have a right to be taught anatomically accurate language. The narrative that teaching teens about sex, STI prevention and consent encourages them to engage in sexual activities is a tired myth, long perpetuated by many Utah politicians. But frankly, I am not willing to allow “alternative facts” to persist in Utah at the cost of our youth’s sexual health and safety, especially our teenage girls.

This may come as a surprise to some, but sexuality is normal part of puberty, of being human. Adolescence, and the accompanying self-exploration or sexual activity will not simply cease to exist if teenagers lose access to Cosmopolitan.

As Turner Bitton, director of Utah Coalition Against Sexual Assault told Good 4 Utah, ”The thing about for example Cosmo ... that’s traditionally where we would see youth get this information.” If Weiler & Co. were to block Utah youths from purchasing this educational source, youths will seek other (often less safe) avenues to satisfy their natural curiosity. Or, they will develop overall unhealthy attitudes towards sex that will prevail long into their adult sex lives.

Pornography isn’t an issue in Utah, but shame definitely is.

As a sexual assault survivor and advocate with Start By Believing Utah, it saddens me to watch this ridiculous porn crusade take precedent over sexual assault prevention. Utah’s 1 in 3 statistic is harrowing, and I am gravely concerned as to how my representatives are (mis)handling Utah’s sexual violence epidemic. With the rare exception of Rep. Angela Romero, who successfully led a bill to test rape kits, Utah’s politicians seem more invested in insidiously promoting their personal or religious beliefs than truly listening to marginalized members of their communities.

I’d suggest Sen. Weiler spend less time considering reviving the “porn czar,” and instead invest in finding more integrated solutions led by sexual assault survivors, professionals and advocates.

Kyli Rodriguez-Cayro is a writer, mental health advocate, grassroots activist and entrepreneur based in Salt Lake City. She is co-chair of the Utah Department of Human Services’ regional System of Care council. She is also a member of Start By Believing Utah, a council who’s mission to educate Utahns on sexual violence and work towards community-led prevention.