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Former FEC chairman from Utah takes job at D.C. law firm

(Screen capture from Sen. Sheldon Whitehouse's Twitter account) A video of Federal Elections Commissioner Matthew Petersen, a former staffer to the late Sen. Bob Bennett and a graduate of Brigham Young University, being questioned about a possible judgeship has gone viral after he failed to answer several queries about rudimentary law by a Republican senator. Petersen is taking a job at a leading law firm after resigning as vice chairman of the Federal Election Commission.

Washington • Utah native Matt Petersen is taking a job at a leading law firm after resigning as vice chairman of the Federal Election Commission.

Petersen, who grew up in Mapleton and served on the FEC for 11 years, announced last month he would depart the regulatory agency, leaving the commission with only half its six members and without a quorum to call meetings, issue fines or investigate possible wrongdoing.

Petersen had served far longer than the six-year term President George W. Bush appointed him to after unsuccessful attempts to replace him on the commission.

The Washington-based law firm Holtzman Vogel Josefiak Torchinsky announced that Petersen, a former two-time chairman of the FEC, is joining it as a partner.

“Matt’s extensive knowledge of federal election law and his experience guiding the commission through a period of profound change will be a tremendous asset to our firm and our clients,” said Jill Holtzman Vogel, founder and managing partner of the law firm.

The firm touts itself as having clients that range from elected officials, candidates, political action committees, nonprofit groups and businesses and helping them manage their government relations operations.

Petersen said he was excited to join the firm and “add my two decades experience in government and election law to their already top-notch team.”

The graduate of Brigham Young University had withdrawn as a nominee for the federal bench after struggling to answer questions from senators during his confirmation hearing.

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