Reliably red Utah will receive its third visit from a Democratic 2020 presidential candidate next week: Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren.

Warren, known for her populist message and focus on income inequality, will host an organizing event at The Depot in Salt Lake City on April 17 as her campaign works to “build our movement for 2020,” according to the event page on Warren’s campaign website.

“Elizabeth is eager to meet voters from cities and towns across the country about issues important to them and their experience,” her campaign said in a statement sent Monday to The Salt Lake Tribune. “She’ll continue traveling to as many states as possible in the coming months and is looking forward to being in Salt Lake City.”

The event, scheduled to begin at 6 p.m., is open and free to the public, but Warren’s campaign encouraged attendees to RSVP in advance.

Warren is the most well known of the candidates in the crowded Democratic field to visit Utah so far. Former Maryland Rep. John Delaney visited the state over a year ago in January 2018 and again earlier this year. Julian Castro, the former secretary of Housing and Urban Development under President Barack Obama, spoke at an event at the University of Utah at the end of February.

“Because there are a zillion Democratic presidential candidates, obviously one of the things they’re doing at this point is trying to get out and make as many contacts to raise as much money and generate as much support as they can,” said Matthew Burbank, a political science professor at the University of Utah. “So even though Utah is not a state where most of these candidates are going to spend any time campaigning in a general election or likely even a primary election, it is a reasonable place to raise money.”

Warren launched her campaign for president at the end of February in Massachusetts, where she called for Medicare for all and the elimination of Washington lobbying. She has since called for the abolishment of the Electoral College. Warren is one of the Democratic Party’s highest-profile figures and has often been criticized by President Donald Trump. Her announcement came on the heels of an apology earlier that month over her claims of Native American identity.

Correction: John Delaney is a former congressman whose term ended in January. A previous version of this story misstated his status.