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Hunter Biden found guilty in gun case

The verdict brought an end to an extraordinary trial that made painfully public Biden’s crack addiction, reckless behavior and ruinous spending.

(Haiyun Jiang | The New York Times) Hunter Biden, son of President Joe Biden, arrives at federal court in Wilmington, Del., on Tuesday morning, June 11, 2024. Jurors in Hunter BidenÕs federal gun trial began deliberations late Monday after prosecutors concluded their case with an exhaustive inventory of evidence they presented over the past week in hopes of proving that Biden knowingly falsified a firearms application in 2018.

A jury in Wilmington, Delaware, on Tuesday found Hunter Biden, President Joe Biden’s long-troubled son, guilty of three felony counts of lying on a federal firearms application in 2018, a grievous personal blow to the Biden family as his father enters the final months of a brutal reelection campaign. He could face up to 25 years in prison, but first-time offenders who did not use their weapons to commit a violent crime typically receive no jail time.

Biden, 54, stood with arms crossed, grimly surveying the jury as they read out the three guilty verdicts. The verdict brought an end to an extraordinary trial that made painfully public Biden’s crack addiction, reckless behavior and ruinous spending — narrated by three former romantic partners, including the widow of his brother, Beau Biden.

Here’s what else to know:

— A sentencing date was not set: The judge in the case, Maryellen Noreika, did not set a date for sentencing, but said it would typically be about four months after the verdict. Although the maximum possible sentence Biden faces is more than two decades behind bars and $750,000 in fines, federal sentencing guidelines call for a fraction of that penalty.

— No pardons are coming. Joe Biden has said he will not pardon his son. The president kept his distance from the trial and was out of office on Oct. 12, 2018, when Hunter Biden asserted he was drug-free on a background check at a time when he was addicted to crack cocaine.

— His legal troubles are not over. The Delaware case, brought by special counsel David C. Weiss, is widely regarded as the least serious of the two federal indictments against Hunter Biden brought last year. He still faces serious tax charges in Los Angeles stemming from his failure to pay the government during a yearslong crack, alcohol and spending binge. The trial is scheduled to start in September.

This article originally appeared in The New York Times.