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Utah pharmacist gave half a dozen people COVID-19 cards without giving them a shot

(AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee) FILE - Vaccination record cards are shown before residents are inoculated, Thursday, Jan. 21, 2021, at the Isles of Vero Beach assisted and independent senior living community in Vero Beach, Fla. The government tasked CVS and Walgreens with administering the shots to long-term care locations in nearly every state. A Utah pharmacist has admitted he gave COVID-19 vaccination cards to half a dozen people without giving them a shot of the vaccine.

A Utah pharmacist has admitted he gave COVID-19 vaccination cards to half a dozen people without giving them a shot of the vaccine.

According to a stipulation order, the pharmacist surrendered his license and agreed to pay a $2,000 fine. He admitted that on or about June 30, he saw a “reluctant patient” whose employer wanted the patient to get vaccinated.

The pharmacist “allowed the pharmacy technician to counsel” the patient on “alleged and/or unconfirmed adverse reactions” to the COVID vaccines — and he “did not correct” the technician when the patient was told “that the vaccination could cause infertility,” according to the order.

The pharmacist was seen on surveillance video entering a room with the patient — off camera — and then returning. He was then seen taking a vial of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine from a refrigerator, recording the manufacturer’s lot number on the vaccine card and giving the card to the patient — but he did not prepare a syringe or administer the vaccine.

According to the stipulation order, the pharmacist said he was giving the patient “a choice.” And also he said had done the same with a “handful of others … maybe five” when he believed they were apprehensive about the vaccine.

“By fraudulently filling out and giving the vaccine card,” the pharmacist “misrepresented the patient as vaccinated, and put the patient and others around the patient at risk of contracting COVID-19,” according to the stipulation order.

After proposing an $8,000 fine, the Division of Occupational and Professional Licensing agreed to the $2,000 fine. The division also stipulated that it “does not guarantee that any future application by the [man] to operate as a pharmacist will be granted.”

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