The big boss isn’t always the best boss. But the best ones can make a big difference, sometimes by doing little things.

Listening. Caring. Sharing. Celebrating. And, at times, getting out of the way.

As part of the Salt Lake Tribune’s annual Top Workplaces survey, its partner, Energage, a Philadelphia-based research and consulting firm, selects three top executives — one each from a large, midsize and small company — for leadership awards.

The Tribune asked 2019′s “top bosses” — Dan Burton of Health Catalyst, a health care vendor; Brock Blake of Lendio, a provider of business services; and Kenny Farnsworth of Rhodes Bake-N-Serv, which produces baked goods — to share their leadership secrets.

Here are their comments, which have been edited for space and clarity:

(Photo courtesy of Health Catalyst) Dan Burton, CEO of Health Catalyst Inc.

Dan Burton, Health Catalyst CEO

Describe your leadership style and why it works for your company.

We believe that if we follow timeless principles in making companywide decisions, and encourage team members to apply these same timeless principles, that we can then trust one another to make specific decisions in any context, without the need for micromanagement.

What is the best leadership advice you have received?

The timeless principles embedded within the golden rule have proven to be of immeasurable value when I have consistently followed them. This helps me to exercise empathy as I strive to put myself in a colleague’s shoes, to listen carefully during our interactions, and to strive to respect and love each individual with whom I interact.

Are there any leadership decisions you’ve made — but regret?

Yes, certainly. The common pattern of these regrets stems from situations where I did not apply timeless principles in making a decision and/or interacting with a colleague. This includes moving hastily forward without fully understanding or listening to a colleague, not having sufficient humility to admit a mistake or to apologize quickly for that mistake, or not taking sufficient time on a people-related item to ensure my colleagues were shown the respect that I should have shown.

What’s the biggest misconception people have about being the top boss?

Perhaps that the CEO has much more direct control over the direction and success of the company than he or she does. It has been fascinating to me to observe, over the course of many years in this role, how little control I personally have, and how much I depend on the voluntary actions of each of my teammates — to choose to bring their best effort, their commitment to the mission, and their contributions to the success of the company. At my very best, I am a “catalyst” to enable my colleagues, my teammates, to build the company in really positive ways.

(Photo courtesy of Lendio) Brock Blake, CEO of Lendio.

Brock Blake, Lendio CEO

Describe your leadership style and why it works for your company.

The idea for Lendio came from my passion to promote the American dream of entrepreneurship through access to capital. But none of what Lendio has accomplished in the last eight years would be possible without a large group of people sharing my obsession. As I’ve worked to build the business, I’ve embraced not only my role as CEO but also my role as CCO (Corporate Culture Officer). I and my executive team have worked to create an environment that supports the collective vision, values and desires of the employees. I believe this has contributed in a big way to Lendio’s success.

What is the best leadership advice you have received?

My grandpa was a personal hero of mine and would regularly say to my siblings and me, “Remember who you are … you’re a Blake!” Grandpa taught us that being a Blake means being a hardworking and caring person of high integrity, no matter who is watching. This stuck with me and serves as a reminder to me to lead by example — as a father, a community member and a CEO.

Are there any leadership decisions you’ve made — but regret?

Too many to name here, but that’s part of the growth process. Over the years, I’ve learned to explore how mistakes can become steppingstones. I’m grateful to be surrounded by team members who also value the idea of leveraging challenges to create a stronger business.

Are leaders born or made?

My parents have six kids, four of whom are founders, CEOs or presidents of companies. Were we born leaders or did our parents set us on that path through their examples? I believe the ability to lead is probably a combination of genetic makeup and environment; it’s nearly impossible to separate nature from nurture.

Is there a leadership skill you are still trying to master?

Slowing down enough to celebrate high-five moments with my team. Early on in my career, I would skip right past these because I was too focused on getting to the next big win. As a business owner, you’ll probably experience both the highest of highs and the lowest of lows. You really have to learn to slow down and enjoy the journey.

What’s the biggest misconception people have about being the top boss?

Being the top boss isn’t all about being the most innovative — though that is important. It’s also about creating an environment where people love coming to work, they believe in the mission of the company, and they want to be part of something bigger than themselves.

(Photo courtesy of Rhodes Bake N Serv) Kenny Farnsworth, CEO of Rhodes Bake-N-Serv

Kenny Farnsworth, Rhodes Bake-N-Serv CEO

Describe your leadership style and why it works for your company.

The best leaders empower people and then get out of the way. My role is to cheer people on and encourage self-development.

What is the best leadership advice you have received?

Leadership is about vision and responsibility, not power. People resent leaders with big egos and trappings of success paid for on the corporate dime.

Are leaders born or made?

Some people are born as natural leaders, but it is a skill set that can be learned. Some of the best leaders I know were not born naturally to it but learned the essential skills and continue to refine these skills.

Is there a leadership skill you are still trying to master?

I could be more patient. I also wish to be a better listener.