At Tintic Mill, come for the early 20th-century industrialism snuggled into what’s now a wildlife management area. Stay to be sickened by lead, arsenic and have a state agent ticket you for trespassing.

The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources on Tuesday issued what’s become a biennial reminder that Tintic Standard Reduction Mill, near Goshen, is closed to the public. The latest news release from DWR says some of the foot traffic to the mill appears to be driven by online guides calling the mill a good place for photography.

Tintic Mill is a remnant of Utah’s mining heritage. It was built in the 1920s, mostly to process silver. It operated for only five years but has left quite a legacy. In that short span, the mill managed to poison the surrounding soil and water with lead and arsenic, according to samples the Utah Department of Environmental Quality took in 2002.

(Photo courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources) A sign tells would-be-visitors to not enter the Tintic Standard Reduction Mill. The mill was built in the 1920s. Lead and arsenic from the mill continue to pollute the surrounding soil and water. The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources now oversees the mill and will issue trespassing citations to people found there.

The mill was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. Ownership transferred to DWR in 1986. The mill is now part of the Goshen Warm Springs Wildlife Management Area.

In a news release, DWR Sgt. Sean Spencer called the mill unsafe.

“And due to an increase in visitors," Spencer said, "we will be actively citing people who trespass on this property.”

(Photo courtesy Utah Division of Wildlife Resources) Graffiti lines the walls of Tintic Standard Reduction Mill in this 2019 photo. The mill was built in the 1920s. Lead and arsenic from the mill continue to pollute the surrounding soil and water. The Utah Division of Wildlife Resources now oversees the mill and will issue trespassing citations to people found there.