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Letter: Romney adresses cost of impeachment vote in accepting Profiles in Courage award

(J. Scott Applewhite | AP) Sen. Mitt Romney, R-Utah, talks briefly to reporters after attending a bipartisan barbecue luncheon, at the Capitol in Washington in September.

Utah Sen. Mitt Romney accepted the 2021 Profile in Courage award from the John F. Kennedy Library Foundation in Boston on Oct. 17.

Romney was visibly touched by the recognition, and acknowledgement of the political pressures and costs he faced during the Trump impeachment trials. He described the comprehensive approach he and his staff took in constructing a detailed timeline of all the events at issue. Romney said that during this long process he vacillated regarding which way he would vote, but when the timeline was completed and all data accounted for, he knew what he had to do based on the oath he had taken as a senatorial jurist.

Event speakers included former ambassador Caroline Kennedy Schlossberg, who remarked how uniquely qualified Romney was to receive this award, extolling his career, and particularly his historic actions and votes placing country above party. Previously, in announcing the award, she wrote he “reminds us that our democracy depends on the courage, conscience and character of our elected officials.”

Republican Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker celebrated Romney’s unique relationship with Massachusetts Democratic Sen. Edward Kennedy. Prior to being elected governor of Massachusetts, Romney mounted an unsuccessful senate campaign against Kennedy, and Baker quipped that this may be the first time the JFK Library Foundation has honored a former Kennedy opponent.

Baker then spoke of Romney’s courage as Massachusetts governor, facing a strongly democratic Legislature, and his successful collaboration with Kennedy in pushing forward in Massachusetts the nation’s first comprehensive health care program that, in Baker’s words “wouldn’t break the bank.” Baker pointed out how crucial the establishment of this program would later become in helping provide critical health care services during the pandemic.

Trudy Simmons, Heber City.

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