Organizers of an exclusive matchmaking event for an unidentified Latter-day Saint millionaire bachelor say a dinner social with 20 prospective women last week was a success and that their client was “blown away by the quality of the women.”

In a prepared statement, The LDS Matchmaker — a company that offers one-on-one dating consultations — said that 20 women were selected from a pool of 2,500 applicants. The finalists include several women from Utah, the statement said, as well as participants from New York City, Louisiana and Idaho.

“Most were college educated and seven had graduate degrees,” the statement said. “All were members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, were beautiful, well-spoken and came away having made new friends and were glad they had come.”

Participants also signed nondisclosure agreements prohibiting them from revealing the identity of the bachelor, according to The LDS Matchmaker, with the man giving each of the 20 women a necklace at the June 7 dinner, which included a PowerPoint presentation of the top 10 reasons he opted to look for a wife through a matchmaking event, a four-course meal, group conversation and a five-minute, one-on-one “mini-date" with each participant.

Friday’s dinner was followed up by several one-on-one dates on Saturday and Sunday.

“We expect good things to come for him and wish him and the women in attendance all the best,” the LDS Matchmaker statement says. “And we are teeing up for our next event, for an amazing, beautiful, female bachelorette looking for love!”

A video shared with The Salt Lake Tribune and posted to Vimeo by The Beehive shows the women arriving by limousine at the Hidden Valley Country Club in Sandy and individually walking a red carpet to off-screen applause.

During the dinner, a master of ceremonies offers a few clues about the bachelor’s identity — his favorite television show, ice cream flavor and soda, and that he survived an airplane fire and once capsized a sailboat — while the bachelor is obscured by an opaque sheet. The video cuts away before his identity is revealed, concluding with interviews of the participating women.

“I decided to apply to this event because it intrigued me how we didn’t know anything, which usually bothers me,” says a woman wearing a “Bri” name tag. "It just seemed fun and I needed to know more about it.”

Event organizers previously disclosed to The Tribune that the millionaire bachelor is a practicing member of the Latter-day Saint faith, originally from San Diego, worked in the White House under a previous Republican president and sold his first company at age 26.