In her first television interview about her adoptive father Woody Allen, Dylan Farrow told "CBS This Morning" that she is telling the truth as she detailed her allegations of molestation against the famed director.

"I loved my father. I respected him. He was my hero," she told Gayle King in the interview that aired Thursday. "And that doesn't obviously take away from what he did. But it does make the betrayal and the hurt that much more intense."

Farrow said she "felt it was important to add my story" to the #MeToo movement, "because it's something I've struggled with for so long." She also wanted celebrities who work with and praise Allen to "acknowledge their complicity and maybe hold themselves accountable to how they have perpetuated this culture of silence in their industry."

She continued: "I have been repeating my accusations unaltered for over 20 years, and I have been systematically shut down, ignored or discredited. If they can't acknowledge the accusations of one survivor, how are they going to stand for all of us?"

Allen has always denied the allegations. "Even though the Farrow family is cynically using the opportunity afforded by the Time's Up movement to repeat this discredited allegation, that doesn't make it any more true today than it was in the past," he said in a statement to CBS. "I never molested my daughter — as all investigations concluded a quarter of a century ago."

During the CBS interview, King played an old clip of Allen denying the allegations and calling them "insane." Dylan Farrow became visibly emotional.

"He's lying and he's been lying for so long," she said. "And it is difficult for me to see him and to hear his voice. I'm sorry."

Farrow said that in 1992, when she was 7 and her mother Mia Farrow was out shopping, Allen instructed her to play with her brother's train and then molested her. She also said that he had been inappropriate at other times, including asking her to get into bed with him while he wore only underwear.

"As a 7-year-old, I would have said he touched my private parts," Dylan Farrow said. The girl then told her mother. "She was upset. ... My first impulse was that I had done something wrong."

Mia Farrow took her to a doctor who asked where she had been touched. Dylan Farrow first pointed to her shoulder. When Mia Farrow asked why she didn't repeat what she had said earlier, "I told her that I was embarrassed. And then we went back in," Dylan Farrow said Thursday, "and I told the doctor."

The accusation turned into headlines during the high-profile split between Mia Farrow and Allen in 1992. Allen has long suggested that Dylan Farrow was coached by her mother, who had months earlier discovered nude photos of her adoptive daughter Soon-Yi Previn. Allen confessed to an affair with Previn; the two married in 1997.

"What I don't understand is how is this crazy story of me being brainwashed and coached is more believable than what I'm saying about being sexually assaulted by my father," Dylan Farrow said Thursday.

Farrow first spoke out publicly about the allegations in a 2014 New York Times essay. And as #MeToo has gained momentum, she has tweeted about Allen and called out specific actors. Last month, she wrote an op-ed in the Los Angeles Times questioning why Allen was exempt from the storm of sexual assault allegations.

This week, Timothée Chalamet joined a growing list of actors who said they wouldn't work with Allen in the future. And earlier this month, Mira Sorvino, who won an Oscar for her role in Allen's 1995 film "Mighty Aphrodite," wrote an open letter apologizing for taking this long to publicly support Dylan Farrow.

On Tuesday, Alec Baldwin provided support to Allen, writing on Twitter that the director had been investigated and no charges were filed. "The renunciation of him and his work, no doubt, has some purpose. But it's unfair and sad to me," Baldwin wrote. "I worked (with Woody Allen) 3 times and it was one of the privileges of my career."

Allen has never been charged. New York state child welfare investigators and a Yale-New Haven Hospital report at the time found abuse did not happen.

Connecticut's then-state prosecutor, Frank Maco, questioned the credibility of the hospital report and said there was probable cause to charge Allen, but Dylan Farrow was too fragile for the high-profile trial.

On Thursday, Dylan Farrow told King she now wishes they had charged Allen.

"I was already traumatized, she said. "Here's the thing: Outside of a court of law, we do know what happened in the attic on that day. I just told you."

After her interview with Farrow concluded, King told her "CBS This Morning" co-anchors that she had reached out to Farrow recently, who had told her that "'even if no one believes me at least I know I said what I needed to say.' She's concerned there will be a backlash."

Here is Allen's full response to CBS:

"When this claim was first made more than 25 years ago, it was thoroughly investigated by both the Child Sexual Abuse Clinic of the Yale-New Haven Hospital and New York State Child Welfare. They both did so for many months and independently concluded that no molestation had ever taken place. Instead, they found it likely a vulnerable child had been coached to tell the story by her angry mother during a contentious breakup. Dylan's older brother Moses has said that he witnessed their mother doing exactly that — relentlessly coaching Dylan, trying to drum into her that her father was a dangerous sexual predator. It seems to have worked — and, sadly, I'm sure Dylan truly believes what she says. But even though the Farrow family is cynically using the opportunity afforded by the Time's Up movement to repeat this discredited allegation, that doesn't make it any more true today than it was in the past. I never molested my daughter — as all investigations concluded a quarter of a century ago."