There are few better ways to start a new year than to take a hike.

Some folks on New Year’s Day organize these on their own to popular spots such as Angels Landing at Zion National Park or the Delicate Arch at Arches.

But for those looking for a formal group, four New Year’s hikes around the state being offered by Utah State Parks might fill the need to get outdoors and hike off some of those holiday calories.

According to Utah State Parks, the state agency will host hikes at Antelope Island, Dead Horse Point, Great Salt Lake and the Territorial Statehouse in Fillmore.

Each of these hikes begins at a different time. Participants should check weather conditions and the temperature before heading out and wear the appropriate gear. Bring plenty of water and snacks. And remember, regular park entrance fees apply.

Here’s details on the four hikes set for Jan. 1:

Antelope Island • Starting at 2 p.m. at the Lakeside Trailhead in White Rock Bay, this is an easy to moderate 2.5-mile hike offering views of Great Salt Lake and a chance to see bison, pronghorn, deer and raptors. For information, email Charity Owens at charityowens@utah.gov.

Dead Horse Point • This hike begins at the visitor center at 9 a.m. and proceeds along the Bighorn Overlook Trail, offering views of sandstone cliffs and the Colorado River. Well-behaved dogs on leashes are welcome. For information, email Scott Chandler at sdchandler@utah.gov.

Great Salt Lake State Park • Take in sunset with this hike. The sun sets on the Great Salt Lake at 5:11 p.m. and the full moon rises over the mountains at 5:12 p.m. This hike takes place on the Silver Sands Beach Trail. Meet at the visitor center parking lot at 5 p.m. and dress warmly. For more information, email James Wells at jameswells@utah.gov.

Territorial Statehouse • A more unusual hike will take place in Fillmore. Meet at 1 p.m. at the Territorial State House. There, hikers get a guided tour of the museum before taking an easy hike to other historical areas in Fillmore. Then enjoy the 122nd anniversary of Utah’s statehood with a pioneer dance at the museum later that evening. For information, contact Carl Aldrich at caldrich@utah.gov.