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Provo driver crashes his $1.3M Ferrari during road rally

Published August 2, 2006 4:57 pm

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2006, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Posted: 4:57:51 PM- MILFORD - A Provo man touring the state in a $1.3 million Ferrari as part of the four-day Utah Fast Pass Road Rally - which involves the Utah Highway Patrol shutting down portions of roads so participants can "open up" their cars - was injured Wednesday morning when he crashed about 27 miles north of Milford.

Richard Losee was one of 30 drivers of exotic sport cars who paid $5,000 apiece to participate in the rally and was on a stretch of State Route 257 when he lost control of his car.

Lt. Doug McCleve, a UHP spokesman, said Losee was flown to Utah Valley Medical Center in Provo after the 10 a.m. accident and admitted with fractured bones.

The Utah Fast Pass Road Rally, organized by Larry Miller's Miller Motorsports Park for the Honoring Heroes Foundation, raises funds to help families of UHP troopers killed or injured in the line of duty.

The 2003 Enzo Ferrari, traveling at about 100 mph, was torn to pieces during the crash. After veering off the road, the car lost its transmission and V-12 engine and came to rest off the other side of the road.

McCleve noted the Italian sports car - for safety reasons - is designed to come apart in a high-speed crash.

"The car did exactly what it was designed to do," McCleve said. "Just the chassis and passenger compartment remained."

UHP Lt. Douglas Rawlinson estimated the Ferrari to be worth $1.3 million.

The rally is designed to showcase 25 to 30 "super cars" such as Ferraris, Porches and Mercedes Benz, according to the Miller Motorsports Park Web site. The drive begins and ends at the sports park in Tooele and includes the UHP shutting down a 15-mile stretch of State Route 257, allowing the drivers to speed in their cars, said Trooper Jeff Nigbur.

The UHP clocked the drivers' speeds and gave them "speeding tickets," the "fines" from which go to charity.