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Gurbeer Singh cleans up merchandise which fell due to an earthquake at a 7-Eleven store Sunday, Aug. 24, 2014, in American Canyon, Calif. Officials say an earthquake with a preliminary magnitude of 6.0 has been reported in California's northern San Francisco Bay area. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)
California earthquake damage estimated at $1 billion
First Published Aug 25 2014 07:39 am • Last Updated Aug 25 2014 03:49 pm

Napa, Calif. • Businesses in California’s wine capital are mopping up thousands of dollars in high-end vintages and sweeping glass from ghostly downtown streets that officials hope will soon bustle again with tourists following the San Francisco Bay Area’s strongest earthquake in 25 years.

With the dust still settling from Sunday’s magnitude-6.0 quake that struck Napa County, local officials estimated Monday that Napa Valley suffered $1 billion in property damage, including the wineries where the quake smashed bottles and overturned wine barrels.

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Napa County Supervisor Bill Dodd says that since 80 percent of the region’s 500 wineries were unaffected, the long-term economic impact to businesses should be modest.

Tourism officials encourage visitors to keep flocking to the charming towns, tasting rooms, restaurants and spas that drive the Napa Valley economy.

The magnitude-6.0 quake struck at 3:20 a.m. PDT Sunday near the city of Napa, an oasis of Victorian-era buildings nestled in the vineyard-studded hills of Northern California. Fires had flared in a mobile home park where four homes were destroyed and two others were damaged, officials said.

By midday Sunday, the fires were out and power was being restored, said Mark Ghilarducci, director of the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services.

"While it was bad, it wasn’t as bad as it could be, and it was very manageable from a regional perspective," Ghilarducci said.

For many, the quake struck at the worst time possible, rousing them in the middle of the night and sending them fumbling in darkness to take cover and find loved ones. A number of the injuries were caused by people stepping on broken glass, falling down or being hit by furniture.

The quake’s timing was also bad for Napa Valley’s famed vineyards, where winemakers were just getting ready to harvest the 2014 crop. The quake broke thousands of bottles of wine and toppled barrels.

Omar Rodriguez, 23, of Napa, was treated for a gash on his forehead in one of the triage tents outside a hospital that handled the victims.


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"We woke up to the earthquake and I thought I was dreaming because I fell off my bed, you know, it was all dark, and I just got back up. She noticed it was all bleeding," he said, referring to his girlfriend.

Officials were assessing the damage in hopes of getting a cost estimate they could submit for possible federal assistance. The initial assessment found that dozens of homes and buildings in the region were unsafe to occupy, including a historic Napa County courthouse, where a 10-foot-wide hole opened a view of the offices inside.

The quake struck about 6 miles south of Napa and lasted 10 to 20 seconds depending on proximity to the epicenter, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. It was the largest to shake the San Francisco Bay Area since the magnitude-6.9 Loma Prieta quake struck in 1989, collapsing part of the Bay Bridge roadway and killing more than 60 people, most when an Oakland freeway fell.

Sunday’s temblor was felt widely throughout the region, from more than 200 miles south of Napa and as far east as the Nevada border.

Queen of the Valley Medical Center in Napa reported treating 172 people in the emergency room, although hospital officials could not say how many of them were there for injuries suffered in the quake and how many for more routine injuries and illnesses, hospital CEO Walt Mickens said.

Twelve people were admitted for broken bones and other medical problems directly related to the earthquake, including an adult who remained in critical condition on Sunday night and a 13-year-old boy.

The teen was hit by flying debris from a collapsed fireplace and had to be airlifted to the children’s hospital at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center for a neurological evaluation. His condition was listed as serious, hospital spokeswoman Phyllis Brown said.

While inspecting the shattered glass at her husband’s storefront office in downtown Napa, Chris Malloy described calling for her two children in the dark as the quake rumbled under the family’s home, tossing heavy pieces of furniture several feet.

"It was shaking and I was crawling on my hands and knees in the dark, looking for them," the 45-year-old woman said, wearing flip flops on feet left bloodied from crawling through broken glass.

About 70,000 customers lost power after the quake hit, but Pacific Gas and Electric spokeswoman Nicole Liebelt said early Monday that the number was down to about 150. The utility said it expects to continue searching for possible gas leaks over the coming days.

The quake also ruptured water mains. Dozens of homes and buildings in the region were deemed unsafe to occupy, including a historic Napa County courthouse, where a 10-foot wide hole opened a view of the offices inside.

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