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This handout photo provided by the Smithsonian National Museum of American History shows production scripts and press materials from NBC’s Will & Grace program, 2000-2006. Max Mutchnick and David Kohan, the creative power behind the hit situation comedy, intentionally presented LGBT characters who were not stereotyped, caricatured, or demeaned. The success of Will & Grace marked a turning point in media portrayals. The museum is acquiring several pieces of history from the gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender community, including items from the TV show “Will and Grace.” (AP Photo/Smithsonian National Museum of American History)
Smithsonian adds LGBT history to museum collection
First Published Aug 19 2014 10:37 am • Last Updated Aug 19 2014 12:47 pm

Washington • Hundreds of photographs, papers and historical objects documenting the history of gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender people are being added to the Smithsonian Institution’s collection Tuesday, including items from the popular TV show "Will and Grace."

Show creators David Kohan and Max Mutchnick along with NBC are donating objects to the National Museum of American History. The collection includes original scripts, casting ideas, political memorabilia surrounding the show and the series finale. The network agreed to donate props, including a pill bottle and flask, a sign from "Grace Adler Interior Design" and Will Truman’s framed college diploma.

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Kohan told The Associated Press that the Smithsonian’s interest in the show featuring gay principal characters was a validation they never dreamed about when the sitcom began airing in 1998. "Will and Grace" ran through May 2006 depicting four friends both gay and straight, eventually ending with the main characters coupled off with children.

"These particular guests that were invited into people’s living rooms happened to be your gay friends," Kohan said. "I don’t think people really had the opportunity to have that before, and it served to, I think, make people recognize that your close friends were gay."

"The fact that it’s in the American history (museum), maybe we were a part of something that was bigger than we ever imagined," Kohan said.

The donation is part of larger effort to document gay and lesbian history, an area that has not been well understood at the museum. Curators are collecting materials from LGBT political, sports and cultural history objects from Arizona to Maryland.

Some items being donated include the diplomatic passports of Ambassador David Huebner, the first openly gay U.S. ambassador confirmed by the Senate, and his husband; materials from a gay community center in Baltimore; and photography collections from Patsy Lynch and Silvia Ros documenting gay rights activism.

From sports history, the museum will receive a tennis racket from former professional player Renee Richards who won a landmark New York Supreme Court decision for transgender rights after she was denied entry to the U.S. Open in 1975.

"There have always been gender non-conforming people in the U.S., and we’ve made contributions and lived life since the beginning of the country," said Curator Katherine Ott who focuses on sexuality and gender. "It’s not talked about and analyzed and understood in the critical ways in which it should be. So for us to build the collection means we can more fully document the history of this country."

"Will and Grace" used comedy to familiarize a mainstream audience with gay culture, said Curator Dwight Blocker Bowers. It was daring and broke ground in the same way "All in the Family" did in the 1970s around issues of bigotry and tolerance, Bowers said.


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Follow Brett Zongker at https://twitter.com/DCArtBeat .



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