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A convoy of white trucks carrying humanitarian aid passes along the main road M4 (Don highway) Voronezh region, Russia, Tuesday, Aug. 12, 2014. Russia on Tuesday dispatched some hundreds of trucks, although only a small proportion were counted in this convoy, covered in white tarps and sprinkled with holy water on a mission to deliver aid to a rebel-held zone in eastern Ukraine. (AP Photo/Pavel Golovkin)
Aid convoy bound for Ukraine parked in southern Russia
First Published Aug 13 2014 06:58 pm • Last Updated Aug 13 2014 07:27 pm

Voronezh, Russia • Hundreds of Russian trucks carrying aid intended for rebel-held eastern Ukraine remained parked Wednesday in the southern Russian city of Voronezh, their fate shrouded in mystery as Ukraine accused Moscow of plotting to use them as a cover for invasion.

Fighting between government troops and pro-Russian separatists increased as the U.N.’s human rights office released figures showing the number of people killed in eastern Ukraine appears to have doubled in the last two weeks to more than 2,000.

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Other than what appeared to be a few supply runs, the roughly 262 vehicles in the convoy lay idle at a military base in Voronezh, one day after making the 400-mile drive from a town outside Moscow.

Ukraine and Russia on Tuesday tentatively agreed that the aid would be delivered to a government-controlled crossing in Ukraine’s Kharkiv region, which hasn’t been touched by the months of fighting, which have wracked neighboring regions. The cargo would then have to be inspected by the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC).

But accord has soured into acrimony with the spokesman for Ukrainian President Poroshenko accusing Moscow of possibly planning a "direct invasion of Ukrainian territory under the guise of delivering humanitarian aid."

Andriy Lysenko, a spokesman for Ukraine’s National Security and Defense Council, said that he "had information" that the convoy won’t go through Kharkiv, but that "nobody knows where it will go."

That leaves the option for the convoy to go through a portion of the border further south that is under the control of the armed pro-Russian separatist rebels who the government has been battling for the last four months. This scenario would certainly not involve the Red Cross and is viewed with profound hostility by the Ukrainian government.

Lysenko said that any deliveries of aid "that don’t have the mandate of the Red Cross ... are taken as aggressive forces and the response will be adequate to that."

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s spokesman, Dmitry Peskov, insisted that the aid convoy was on the move inside Russia, but declined to comment on the route. He said the operation was proceeding in full cooperation with the Red Cross.

But Red Cross officials in Ukraine said they have been left in the dark about the whereabouts of the Russian aid.


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"The final route is not known. Even at the moment I am trying to find out where the convoy is," said Andre Loersch, a spokesman for the ICRC mission in Ukraine.

The estimated 2,000 metric tons of aid, which reportedly includes goods ranging from baby food to portable generators, is intended for civilians in the Luhansk region, the scene of some of the fiercest fighting between government troops and pro-Russian separatists.



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