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Rep. Steve Scalise, R-La., the new House GOP whip, leaves a closed-door Republican strategy session on the immigration crisis at the U.S.-Mexico border after last-minute maneuvering failed to lock down conservative support for a planned vote, at the Capitol in Washington, Thursday, July 31, 2014. The surprise developments, coming on Congress' final day of action ahead of a five-week summer recess, were an embarrassing setback for Speaker John Boehner and his leadership team as a small group of tea party lawmakers once again upset their plans. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House GOP weighs tough new immigration bills
First Published Aug 01 2014 08:48 am • Last Updated Aug 01 2014 07:30 pm

Washington • House Republicans pushed legislation on Friday that could clear the way for eventual deportation of more than 500,000 immigrants brought to the U.S. illegally as kids and could address the surge of immigrants at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Yet President Barack Obama said they made a bad bill worse and promised to veto the measure if it reaches his desk. Obama called it "the most extreme and unworkable versions of a bill that they already know is going nowhere" and said he would have to act unilaterally to deal with the border crisis.

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After more than a year of inaction on the contentious issue of immigration, House GOP leaders were optimistic about securing tea party and other conservative support for two bills that Republicans can highlight when they return home to voters during Congress’ five-week summer break.

Votes were expected late Friday.

House Republicans were still making last-minute changes to the bills on Friday, a day after leaders were forced to abandon a scheduled vote in the face of tea party opposition. It was an embarrassment for the new leadership team and left them cajoling reluctant lawmakers on Friday.

"We’re in very good shape," said Rep. Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., the new majority leader.

The gridlock on the border crisis reflected the past 18 months of a divided, dysfunctional Congress that has little legislation to show for its days in Washington but plenty of abysmal public approval numbers.

The Senate passed a comprehensive immigration bill more than a year ago that would create a pathway for citizenship for the 11.5 million immigrants living in the U.S. illegally, tighten border security and establish new visa and enforcement programs. The measure has languished in the House despite calls from national Republicans, business groups, religious organizations and labor for lawmakers to act.

The revised, $694 million border security bill would provide $35 million for the National Guard and clarify a provision on quickly returning unaccompanied minors from Central America to their home countries. Obama had requested $3.7 billion to handle the tens of thousands flooding into the United States.

To appeal to hard-core immigration foes, Republicans also toughened a companion bill targeting the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which President Barack Obama implemented in 2012 and Republicans blame for the flood of immigrants now.


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The bill states that the president cannot renew or expand the program, effectively paving the way for deportation of children brought to the U.S. illegally, according to several House Republicans.

"Overall there is a distrust of the president," said Rep. Blake Farenthold, R-Texas. "There’s a concern about giving him wiggle room, and if you give him money, he’ll do what he wants to with it."

Two of the fiercest immigration opponents — Reps. Steve King, R-Iowa, and Michele Bachmann, R-Minn. — said they were enthusiastically on board after meeting with leadership Thursday night. The conservative group Heritage Action urged members to back the bill, saying it essentially freezes the program by denying it federal dollars.

"We got to yes," Bachmann said. "This is a tremendous accomplishment "

Even if the House passes the border bill, Obama’s request for more money to deal with the crisis will go unanswered. The Senate blocked its version of a border security bill, and there are no plans to work out any compromise before Congress returns in September.

Emerging from a closed-door GOP meeting, Rep. John Mica, R-Fla., rejected the notion that it was a pointless exercise since the Senate won’t act.

"It’ll be the template for what needs to be done and also it might slow the president down," Mica told reporters.

The border crisis has changed the political dynamic, with polls showing support for immigration overhaul dropping. Moderate House Republicans were intent on returning home with a vote on the border crisis three months before midterm elections.

"The American people expect us to do our jobs," said moderate GOP Rep. Charlie Dent of Pennsylvania. "We have both a border and humanitarian crisis to deal with, and they expect us to take action now."

The Senate blocked a $3.5 billion border package that also included money for Western wildfires and Israel, with Republicans and two Democrats — Louisiana’s Mary Landrieu and Joe Manchin of West Virginia — opposed. Opponents argued that the bill amounted to a blank check for Obama with no policy changes.

The Senate vote was 50-44, short of the 60 votes necessary to move forward on the measure.

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