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Another tiny Wyoming town goes up for sale
First Published Jul 21 2014 11:42 am • Last Updated Jul 21 2014 11:42 am

Aladdin, Wyo. • Here’s a gift for someone who has everything: A tiny town in far northeastern Wyoming named Aladdin.

You won’t need a genie in a bottle to buy it. Just $1.5 million gets you 30 acres and 15 buildings, including a 118-year-old general store that’s still operating.

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Rick and Judy Brengle bought the town 28 years ago and now want to move on from the full-time job of running it.

"We bought this place because I had empty-nest syndrome," Judy Brengle said. "All our kids had gone to college, so my husband bought me a town."

Aladdin doesn’t have a government population count but about 15 people live in the town on a state highway midway between Devils Tower National Monument and Sturgis, South Dakota, famous for its huge annual motorcycle rally.

Recreation opportunities abound in the nearby Black Hills and Bear Lodge Mountains.

Aladdin isn’t the only Wyoming town to hit the market. Last year, the southeast Wyoming town of Buford, population 1, sold for $900,000 and was renamed PhinDeli Town by its new owner to promote a brand of Vietnamese coffee sold there.

The Brengles haven’t changed a thing about the two-story general store in Aladdin, except to put on a new roof. A pot-bellied stove provides heat, the Gillette News-Record reported (http://tinyurl.com/puzpaty ) Sunday.

The place sells fishing supplies, groceries, antiques, art, beer and hardware. It doesn’t have running water, but there are two working outhouses nearby.

Aladdin got its name in 1894 from folks who hoped to strike it rich just like the fellow in the Arabian Nights folktale.


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Owning Aladdin has been a full-time job and then some for the Brengles. When Judy Brengle isn’t ordering clothes or doing inventory, she’s sorting mail or selling beer and cigarettes.

She said she has grandkids who will keep tending the store and post office indefinitely.

"We’ve had several interested buyers, but not very many people want to work seven days a week," Brengle said.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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