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Members of Congress descend to a secure area at the Capitol to meet with national security officials for an intelligence briefing about the decision to swap captive Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl for five detainees at Guantanamo Bay, in Washington, Monday, June 9, 2014. The House of Representatives has been away since President Barack Obama announced the controversial exchange. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House nears approval of bill improving vets’ care
Health » A united House pushed toward legislation to allow patients who endure long waits to get V.A.-paid treatment from local doctors.
First Published Jun 10 2014 11:35 am • Last Updated Jun 10 2014 09:01 pm

Washington • United and in a hurry, the House pushed toward passage Tuesday of legislation to allow patients enduring long waits for care at Veterans Affairs facilities to get VA-paid treatment from local doctors. It’s Congress’ latest response to the outcry over backlogs and falsified data at the agency.

The vote comes as the agency reels from mounting evidence that workers fabricated data on veterans’ waits for medical appointments in an effort to mask frequent, long delays. A VA audit this week showed that more than 57,000 new patients have had to wait at least three months for initial appointments.

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"I cannot state it strongly enough — this is a national disgrace," said House Veterans Affairs Committee Chairman Jeff Miller, R-Fla., chief author of the legislation, as lawmakers debated the bill.

"We often hear that the care that veterans receive at the VA facilities is second to none — that is, if you can get in," said Rep. Mike Michaud of Maine, top Democrat on the committee. "As we have recently learned, tens of thousands of veterans are not getting in."

The controversy led Eric Shinseki to resign as head of the VA on May 30, and the situation is a continuing embarrassment for President Barack Obama and a potential political liability for congressional Democrats seeking re-election in November.

Monday night, a top VA official told the veterans committee that there is "an integrity issue here among some of our leaders."

Philip Matkovsky, who helps oversee the VA’s administrative operations, said of patients’ long waits and efforts to hide them, "It is irresponsible, it is indefensible, and it is unacceptable. I apologize to our veterans, their families and their loved ones."

Matkovsky did not specify which VA officials had questionable integrity. The agency has started removing top officials at its medical facility in Phoenix, a focal point of the department’s problems, and investigators have found indications of long waits and falsified records of patients’ appointments at many other facilities.

Asked by panel chairman Miller whether officials at the agency’s main office had ordered manipulation of patients’ data, Matkovsky said he was not aware of that, adding, "I certainly hope they have not."

Richard Griffin, acting VA inspector general, told lawmakers his investigators were probing for wrongdoing at 69 agency medical facilities, up from 42 two weeks ago. He said he has discussed evidence of manipulated data with the Justice Department, which he said was still considering whether crimes occurred.


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"Once somebody loses his job or gets criminally charged, it will no longer be a game and that will be the shot heard around the system," Griffin said.

The VA drew intensified public attention two months ago with reports of patients dying while awaiting agency care and of cover-ups at the Phoenix center. The VA, the country’s largest health care provider, serves almost 9 million veterans.

The House bill would let veterans facing delayed appointments or living more than 40 miles from a VA facility to choose to get care from non-agency providers for the next two years.

It would also ban bonuses for all VA employees through 2016 and require an independent audit of agency health care. An earlier House-passed bill would make it easier to fire top VA officials.

Miller said VA would save $400 million annually by eliminating bonuses, money the agency could use for expanded care at its centers.

Senators have written a similar bill, which Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev., said his chamber will consider "as soon as it is ready."

Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., said the chamber should debate the bill immediately, instead of first considering a Democratic measure letting borrowers refinance student loans at lower rates.

"Veterans have been made to wait long enough at these hospitals. Congress shouldn’t keep them in the waiting room by putting partisan games ahead of solutions," McConnell said.

On Monday, the VA released an internal audit showing more than 57,000 new patients had to wait at least three months for initial appointments. It also found that over the past decade, nearly 64,000 newly enrolled veterans requesting appointments never got them, though it was unclear how many still wanted VA care.

The audit covered 731 VA medical facilities. It said 13 percent of scheduling employees said they’d been instructed to enter falsified appointment dates, and 8 percent used unofficial appointment lists, both practices aimed at improving agency statistics on patient wait times.

As a result, the agency said it was ordering further investigations at 112 locations where interviews revealed indications of fabricated scheduling data or of supervisors ordering falsified lists.

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