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Police add texting to crisis negotiation arsenal

First Published May 11 2014 11:33AM      Last Updated May 11 2014 11:34 am

Police negotiator Andres Wells was doing all he could to keep a suspect from committing suicide after a gas station robbery and 100 mph chase. But the man kept cutting phone calls short and pointing his handgun to his head.

About 10 minutes after the last hang up, Wells' cellphone chimed. It was a text from the suspect.

"Please call Amie," the message said, followed by the number of the man's girlfriend.

Wells was taken aback. In three years as a negotiator with the Kalamazoo, Michigan, police, he'd always relied on spoken give-and-take, taking cues from a person's tone of voice, the inflections, emotions. He'd never thought about negotiating via text.



"It had never even been brought up at one of our training," Wells recalled of the 2011 case.

With 6 billion text messages exchanged daily in the U.S. alone, law enforcement officers are increasingly being called upon to defuse violent, unpredictable situations through the typed word. Experts say it's happened enough in the last five years to warrant new, specialized training.

But in Wells' case, he had to adapt on the fly.

"What do you want me to tell her?" he texted back.

"The truth," suspect Jesse Cook wrote.

While Wells ordinarily would rely on a skill called "active listening," he couldn't hear Cook's voice. Cook couldn't hear his. Was he yelling? Crying?

"It's not the preferred method of communication in a crisis, but if it's the only way that we have, then we'll engage," said New York State Police spokeswoman Darcy Wells.

Outside Buffalo, New York, in March, a suspect who'd shot at Erie County Sheriff's deputies responding to a domestic call was carrying on text exchanges with several relatives when law enforcement negotiators got involved in the electronic conversations, eventually persuading him to surrender.

"He didn't want to talk as much as he wanted to text," Sheriff's Capt. Gregory Savage said. "It wasn't part of the training I got when I went through the crisis negotiator school put on by the FBI, but it's something that they are incorporating into any new training."

Red Bank, Tennessee, Police Chief Tim Christol includes texting in his sessions and has published articles on the topic.

Besides adrenaline rendering negotiators all thumbs on a miniature keypad, Christol said, many of the typical skills officers employ to get people talking don't always translate, things like emotional labeling — telling someone "I hear sadness" or "You sound angry."

"We're losing those verbal cues that we want to listen to to help us decide where this person is — if they're manic at the time, if they're in a state of depression," Christol said. "Words are only 7 percent of communication."

In Kalamazoo, Wells used Cook's text about telling his girlfriend the truth as a way to show empathy and build trust. He texted that he understood the unemployed veteran was trying to provide for his girlfriend and daughter when he robbed the gas station.

There was no response.

 

 

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AT A GLANCE

Standoff texts

Excerpts from the text exchange between Kalamazoo, Michigan, police negotiator Andres Wells and suspect Jesse Cook during a July 6, 2011, standoff. With 6 billion text messages exchanged daily in the United States, texting is becoming a more frequent part of police crisis negotiations.

WELLS, 2:14 a.m.: This doesn’t have to go down like this

WELLS, 2:15 a.m.: Do you need anything? Water? Food?

COOK, 2:16 a.m.: Water.

WELLS, 2:17 a.m.: Water is coming up. I’ll let you know when. Some guys with a shield are going to bring it up. They will not try anything. Don’t worry

COOK, 2:19 a.m.: Probably be messy if they do. I’m already nervous as (expletive).

WELLS, 2:20 a.m.: I know. Don’t worry. We don’t want this to be a mess. I’ll help you through it. I got Gatorade here. You ready?

...

WELLS, 2:22 a.m.: Roll the window down all the way. This guy throws like a girl. And please keep your hands visible. OK?

WELLS, 2:24 a.m.: Can you put both hands up where they can see them. So they know u wont shoot them

WELLS, 2:25 a.m.: They r scared that if you reach for the Gatorade by instinct the gun might get squeezed

WELLS, 2:25 a.m.: Can u just set it down for a sec. I promise no one will try anything

WELLS, 2:26 a.m.: They wont even get close

COOK, 2:26 a.m.: This is all I have left.

WELLS, 2:26 a.m.: I’ll help u through.

COOK, 2:29 a.m.: Thanks. He does throw like a girl.

COOK, 2:29 a.m.: : )

WELLS, 2:29 a.m.: Nice. : ) can I call u?

COOK, 2:30 a.m.: OK.

Cook surrendered 15 minutes later.

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Source: Kalamazoo County Office of the Prosecuting Attorney


 

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