Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
A demonstrator is taken away on a motorcycle by Bolivarian National Guards soldiers during clashes at an anti-government protest in Caracas, Venezuela, Saturday, April 26, 2014. Student organizers at the last minute decided against marching downtown to avoid a confrontation with security forces in the government-controlled district. Instead they concentrated in the wealthier, eastern neighborhoods that have been the hotbed of unrest since February. (AP Photo/Fernando Llano)
Scores of Venezuelans march against government
First Published Apr 26 2014 07:02 pm • Last Updated Apr 26 2014 08:39 pm

Caracas, Venezuela • Scores of opponents of President Nicolas Maduro marched in Caracas on Saturday, vowing to remain on the streets in defiance of a high court ruling limiting protests.

Student organizers at the last minute decided against marching downtown to avoid a confrontation with security forces in the government-controlled district. Instead they concentrated in the wealthier, eastern neighborhoods that have been the hotbed of unrest since February.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

Demonstrators carried signs on Saturday blasting a Supreme Court ruling this week that gives police the right to disperse protests that don’t have a permit. Opponents say the ruling is the latest attempt by the socialist government to muzzle dissent amid widespread discontent with 57 percent inflation and record shortages.

Protests that the government blames for more than 40 deaths have lost some of their momentum in recent weeks in the face of a government crackdown and an attempt at dialogue by some members of the opposition.

While Maduro is unlikely to cede to opposition demands that it grant an amnesty for jailed activists, the negotiations could force him to loosen the state’s tight grip on the economy, said Dimitris Pantoulas, a Caracas-based political consultant.

He points to the government’s wink-wink approval of recent price increases for regulated goods and its willingness to divert government savings earmarked for social spending to fund private investments as a sign of encroaching pragmatism.

"Just sitting across the same table as the government is something the opposition hasn’t achieved in 15 years" of socialist rule, said Pantoulas.

While students are boycotting the talks, they’re asserting considerable pressure on the negotiators by refusing to abandon the streets. For more than a month, dozens have been camping outside the offices of the United Nations, blocking several lanes of traffic on one of the capital’s busiest thoroughfares.

———

Goodman reported from Bogota, Colombia.


story continues below
story continues below



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.