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A view of the city of Iquique, Chile, after an earthquake struck late Tuesday, April 1, 2014. A powerful magnitude-8.2 earthquake struck off Chile's northern coast Tuesday night. Buildings also shook in nearby Peru and in Bolivia's high altitude capital of La Paz. (AP Photo/Cristian Viveros) NO PUBLICAR EN CHILE
7.8 aftershock rattles Chile’s far-northern coast
First Published Apr 02 2014 09:27 pm • Last Updated Apr 02 2014 10:08 pm

Iquique, Chile • A powerful 7.8-magnitude aftershock hit Chile’s far-northern coast late Wednesday night, shaking the same area where a magnitude-8.2 earthquake hit just a day before causing some damage and six deaths.

Chile’s Emergency Office and navy issues a tsunami alert and ordered a precautionary evacuation of low-lying areas on the northern coast, meaning many people could be spending another sleepless night away from their homes.

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The aftershock caused buildings to shake and people to run out into the streets in the port of Iquique, which was one of the cities that saw some damage from Tuesday night’s big quake. But there were no immediate reports of new damage or injuries from the latest tremor, which was one of dozens that have followed the 8.2 quake.

The aftershock was center 14 miles (23 kilometers) south of Iquique. The USGS said the aftershock had a depth of 12 miles (20 kilometers).

It was felt across the border in southern Peru, where people in the cities of Tacna and Arequipa reportedly fled buildings in fear.

Authorities reported just six deaths from the 8.2-magnitude quake. It was possible others could have been killed in older structures made of adobe in remote communities that weren’t immediately accessible, but it was still a very low toll for such a powerful shift in the undersea fault that runs along the length of South America’s Pacific coast.

Chile is one of the world’s most seismic countries and is particularly prone to tsunamis, because of the way the Nazca tectonic plate plunges beneath the South American plate, pushing the towering Andes cordillera ever higher.




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