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(FILE - In this Saturday, March 29, 2014 file photo, an object floats in the southern Indian Ocean in this picture taken from a Royal New Zealand Air Force P-3K2 Orion aircraft searching for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. Anticipation has repeatedly turned into frustration in the search for signs of Flight 370 as some of the objects spotted from planes in a new search area west of Australia have turned out to be nothing more than garbage. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool) , File)
Australia’s P.M. pledges to keep searching for plane
First Published Mar 31 2014 06:49 pm • Last Updated Mar 31 2014 08:33 pm

Perth, Australia • Although it has been slow, difficult and frustrating so far, the search for the missing Malaysia Airlines jet is nowhere near the point of being scaled back, Australia’s prime minister pledged Monday.

The three-week hunt for Flight 370 has turned up no sign of the Boeing 777, which vanished March 8 with 239 people bound for Beijing from Kuala Lumpur. Ten planes and 11 ships found no sign of the missing plane in the search zone in the southern Indian Ocean, about 1,850 kilometers (1,150 miles) west of Australia, officials said.

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The search area has evolved as experts analyzed Flight 370’s limited radar and satellite data, moving from the seas off Vietnam, to the waters west of Malaysia and Indonesia, and then to several areas west of Australia. The search zone is now 254,000 square kilometers (98,000 square miles), about a 2½-hour flight from Perth.

Items recovered so far were discovered to be flotsam unrelated to the Malaysian plane. Several orange-colored objects spotted by plane Sunday turned out to be fishing equipment.

Those leading the effort remain undaunted, with Prime Minister Tony Abbott saying officials are "well, well short" of any point where they would scale back the hunt. In fact, he said the intensity and magnitude of operations "is increasing, not decreasing."

"I’m certainly not putting a time limit on it. ... We can keep searching for quite some time to come," Abbott said at RAAF Pearce, the Perth military base coordinating the operation.

"We owe it to the families, we owe it to everyone that travels by air. We owe it to the anxious governments of the countries who had people on that aircraft. We owe it to the wider world which has been transfixed by this mystery for three weeks now," he said.

"If this mystery is solvable, we will solve it," Abbott said.

On Monday, former Australian defense chief Angus Houston began his role of heading the new Joint Agency Coordination Center, which will oversee communication with international agencies involved in the search.

The center said Tuesday’s search would focus on a much smaller 64,975 square kilometers (25,087 square miles) of ocean west of Perth, with poor weather and low visibility forecast.


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Nine ships would search four separate areas within the search zone, and 10 planes would join Tuesday’s search, the center said.

The center did not immediately respond Tuesday to a request for an explanation of the more refined search area. It also did not say how far west of Perth Tuesday’s search would be conducted.

"Yesterday’s search revealed nothing that was seen or found that had any connection to the Malaysian aircraft," Houston told Australia’s Seven Network television earlier Tuesday.

"If we can find any debris anywhere, that will enable the search to be focused much more precisely and the high technology can then come into play," he added.

Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak plans to travel to Perth on Wednesday to see the search operations firsthand.

Abbott called the operation "an extraordinarily difficult exercise."

"We are searching a vast area of ocean and we are working on quite limited information," he said, noting that the best brains in the world and all technological mastery is being applied to the task.

The Ocean Shield, an Australian warship carrying a U.S. device that detects "pings" from the plane’s flight recorders, left Perth on Monday evening for the search zone, a three- to four-day trip. The Australian Maritime Safety Authority, which is coordinating the search, said it conducted sea trials to test the equipment.

Investigators are hoping to first find debris floating on the surface that will help them calculate where the plane went into the water.

In Malaysia, several dozen Chinese relatives of Flight 370 passengers visited a Buddhist temple near Kuala Lumpur to pray for their loved ones. They offered incense, bowed their heads in silence and knelt several times during the prayers.

Buddhist nuns handed out prayer beads to them and said: "You are not alone. You have the whole world’s love, including Malaysia’s."

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