Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Connecticut’s hourly $10.10 minimum wage a 1st
First Published Mar 27 2014 07:19 pm • Last Updated Mar 27 2014 07:19 pm

New Britain, Conn. • Connecticut Gov. Dannel P. Malloy signed legislation Thursday that will raise Connecticut’s minimum wage to $10.10 an hour by 2017, the highest rate for any state in the country.

Surrounded by state lawmakers and officials, Malloy appeared at a packed Café Beauregard, the same New Britain restaurant where he dined earlier this month with President Barack Obama and several other New England governors. The president was in town to advocate for a national $10.10 minimum wage.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

After signing the bill, Malloy said it was one of his "proudest days as governor" and added: "It’s time to get people out of poverty."

Earlier in the day, Malloy and legislative leaders received a congratulatory phone call from Vice President Joe Biden, who thanked Connecticut for being the first state to pass legislation enacting the $10.10 wage. Some cities, but no states, have higher minimum wages.

"Our message back to the vice president was, ‘Mr. Vice President, you can use this and use the states that are marching in the right direction. But we need to do this on a national basis,’" Malloy said. "No one in no state should work 40 hours a week and still live in poverty. Connecticut has put the marker down. Other states will follow. We’re going to get the job done."

Connecticut’s Democratic-controlled state House and Senate approved the bill Wednesday, with only Democrats supporting the legislation. The bill will increase the state’s current minimum hourly wage of $8.70 to $9.15 on Jan. 1, 2015, to $9.60 in January 2016 and to $10.10 in January 2017.

Legislative Republicans and various business groups criticized the increase as another action making Connecticut uncompetitive. The state’s wage recently climbed to $8.70 on Jan. 1. It was previously scheduled to also increase to $9 next year.

"Many small business owners were disappointed by the increase last year but partially relieved that the issue was behind them. Suddenly it’s back and it’s bigger," said Andrew Markowski, Connecticut director of the National Federation of Independent Business. "They must be wondering what’s next, and who could blame them?"




Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.