Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
FILE - This photo provided by the FBI shows Paul Ciancia, 23. Ciancia, charged with fatally shooting a Transportation Security Administration screener and wounding three other people at Los Angeles International Airport, Nov. 1, 2013. Thousands of Los Angeles International Airport workers had no idea what to do when this gunman opened fire last year or how to help because they were inadequately trained to deal with an emergency, according to a union report obtained Friday March 14, 2014. (AP Photo/FBI, File)
Report rips LAX communication breakdown during fatal shooting
First Published Mar 18 2014 06:26 pm • Last Updated Mar 18 2014 07:54 pm

BC-US--LA Airport Shooting, 8th Ld-Writethru,966

Report details out-of-sync response to LAX shooter

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

AP Photo LA101, NY111

Eds: New approach. Adds reaction. Edits throughout. With AP Photos. AP Video.

By TAMI ABDOLLAH

Associated Press

LOS ANGELES • Los Angeles International Airport was ill prepared for a crisis when a gunman ambushed security officers last year, and the emergency response was hindered by communication problems and poor coordination, according to a report released Tuesday.

The report obtained in advance by The Associated Press spotlighted flaws in various divisions of the airport and in systems that were in place, but it did not single out individuals responsible for problems.

It also didn’t mention that two airport police officers assigned to Terminal 3 were out of position without notifying dispatchers, as required, or discuss a decision months before the shooting to have police officers roam terminals instead of staffing security checkpoints such as the one approached by the attacker.

Mayor Eric Garcetti said a number of issues detailed in the report have been addressed and work will continue on others.


story continues below
story continues below

"I expect this airport to take care of this airport," Garcetti said at a news conference. "It is not something where we’re going to look for the cavalry to come in and to save us ... We had a pretty good system, but pretty good isn’t good for me."

The 83-page report was put together by a consultant based on findings by several agencies that responded to the shooting and a review of camera footage, dispatch logs and 911 calls.

It cited the heroism of officers who shot and arrested Paul Ciancia after a Transportation Security Administration officer was killed and three other people were injured on Nov. 1.

However, it also detailed lapses in technology and coordination and included some 50 recommendations and lessons learned.

"Had the attacker not been highly selective in his targets, and/or had there been multiple attackers with weapons of greater lethality, the outcome might have been far different," the report said.

J. David Cox Sr., national president of the American Federation of Government Employees, said Tuesday the lack of coordination was "absolutely unacceptable" and medical aid to the fatally wounded TSA officer should not have been delayed.

The AP previously found that the TSA officer was not taken to an ambulance for 33 minutes.

"This report confirmed what we already knew — that the security processes and systems at LAX are fundamentally broken," Cox said.

The report called for training airport police in tactical medicine so they can help the injured before paramedics arrive, and for training paramedics to enter more dangerous zones earlier with law enforcement protection.

Cox also called the report incomplete and off-target in ignoring that law enforcement officers had been redeployed to roam terminals and that two officers were out of position when the shooting began.

LAX Police Chief Patrick Gannon said he was satisfied with the activities of the officers. However, Garcetti said airport policies requiring notification must be enforced and officers should be reminded and retrained about those rules.

Next Page >


Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.