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Overwhelming majority wants to follow the news
Study » Most people say their media habit doesn’t include paying for it.
First Published Mar 17 2014 08:02 pm • Last Updated Mar 17 2014 09:01 pm

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On the media buffet, people still seek meaty news

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By CONNIE CASS

Associated Press

WASHINGTON • Americans of all ages still pay heed to serious news even as they seek out the lighter stuff, choosing their own way across a media landscape that no longer relies on front pages and evening newscasts to dictate what’s worth knowing, according to a new study from the Media Insight Project.

The findings burst the myth of the media "bubble" — the idea that no one pays attention to anything beyond a limited sphere of interest, like celebrities or college hoops or Facebook posts.

"This idea that somehow we’re all going down narrow paths of interest and that many people are just sort of amusing themselves to death and not interested in the news and the world around them? That is not the case," said Tom Rosenstiel, executive director of the American Press Institute, which teamed with the Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research on the project.

People today are nibbling from a news buffet spread across 24-hour television, websites, radio, newspapers and magazines, and social networks.


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Three-fourths of Americans see or hear news daily, including 6 of 10 adults under age 30, the study found. Nearly everyone — about 9 in 10 people — said they enjoy keeping up with the news. And more than 6 in 10 say that wherever they find the news, they prefer it to come directly from a news organization.

The study found relatively few differences by age, political leanings or wealth when it comes to the topics people care about. Traffic and weather are nearly universal interests. Majorities express interest in natural disasters, local news, politics, the economy, crime and foreign coverage.

With so many sources and technologies, 60 percent of Americans say it’s easier to keep up than it was just five years ago.

But at the same time, Jane Hall, an associate professor of journalism at American University, said no one is setting the national news agenda the way The New York Times and network evening news once did.

"I do lament those times in which something could become so important that we all watched," Hall said. "But that doesn’t mean we aren’t all engaged now."

If you’re under 30, the future of news is in your hands, literally.

Three out of 4 young adults who carry cellphones use them to check the news. Most owners of tablet computers also use them to get updates; young people are the ones most likely to have tablets.

But the young think of news differently than previous generations did, said Rachel Davis Mersey, an associate professor at Northwestern’s Medill School of Journalism. Their broader definition includes anything happening right now, whether it’s sports or entertainment or politics.

"We don’t see young people thinking of it as a civic obligation to keep up with news," Mersey said. "We see young people including news as part of a very complex, very diverse, very large media diet that includes a diversity of sources, a diversity of platforms and really goes 24/7."

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