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People wait in a line to stock up on bottled water at a supermarket in Charleston, W.Va. on Saturday, Jan. 11, 2014 in the wake of Freedom Industries' chemical spill into the Elk River on Thursday. Customers were allowed to purchase up to four cases of water at a time. As many stores ran out, the West Virginia National Guard was sent to bring bottled water to local distribution centers. (AP Photo/Michael Switzer)
Tainted tap water shutters West Virginia businesses
Chemical spill » Restaurants shut, hotels are emptied.
First Published Jan 11 2014 07:28 pm • Last Updated Mar 24 2014 11:33 pm

Charleston, W.Va. • On the third day without clean tap water, business owners with empty dining rooms and quiet aisles of merchandise around West Virginia’s capital were left to wonder how much of an economic hit they’ll take from a chemical spill.

Most visitors have cleared out of Charleston while locals are either staying home or driving out of the area to find somewhere they can get a hot meal or a shower. Orders not to use tap water for much other than flushing toilets mean that the spill is an emergency not just for the environment but also for businesses.

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A water company executive said Saturday that it could be days before uncontaminated water is flowing again for about 300,000 people in nine West Virginia counties.

Virtually every restaurant was closed Saturday, unable to use water to prepare food, wash dishes or clean employees’ hands. Meanwhile, hotels had emptied and foot traffic was down at many retail stores.

"I haven’t been able to cook anything at home and was hoping they were open," Bill Rogers, 52, said outside a closed Tudor’s Biscuit World in Marmet, just east of Charleston. "It seems like every place is closed. It’s frustrating. Really frustrating."

In downtown Charleston, the Capitol Street row of restaurants and bars were locked up. The Consignment Shop was open, but business was miserable. The second-hand shop’s owner said she relies on customers who come downtown to eat and drink.

"It’s like a ghost town," Tammy Krepshaw said. "I feel really bad for all my neighbors. It’s sad."

The person she doesn’t feel bad for is Freedom Industries President Gary Southern, who told reporters the day before that he was having a long day and quickly wrapped up a news conference on the spill so he could fly out of the area.

The emergency began Thursday, when complaints came in to West Virginia American Water about a licorice-type odor in the tap water. The source: the chemical 4-methylcyclohexane methanol that leaked out of a 40,000 gallon tank at a Freedom Industries facility along the Elk River. State officials said Saturday they believe about 7,500 gallons leaked from the tank; it’s not clear exactly how much entered the water supply.

It could take days for clean tap water to flow again. First, water sample test results must consistently show that the chemical’s presence in the public water system is at or below 1 part per million, the level recommended by federal agencies, West Virginia American Water President Jeff McIntyre said Saturday at a news conference.


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Thirty-two people sought treatment at area hospitals for symptoms such as nausea.

Federal authorities, including the U.S. Chemical Safety Board, opened an investigation into Thursday’s spill.

By Saturday morning, FEMA said it had delivered about 50 truckloads of water, or 1 million liters, to West Virginia for distribution at sites including fire departments.

While restaurants are having the most trouble, the effect ripples to other businesses, Ballard said. When people go out to dinner, they also shop. And restaurant workers who miss paychecks aren’t spending as much money.

During the emergency, many people are just staying home, while others are leaving the region and staying with family and friends.

In downtown, the store Taylor Books usually fills the 40 seats in its cafe. But the cafe was shut down by the state Department of Health on Friday because it said employees had no way to safely wash their hands before serving customers. On Saturday only three people sat in the bookstore using the wireless Internet. Manager Dan Carlisle said he canceled a musician scheduled to play that night and the store was going to close five hours early.

Some bars have remained open, but they’ve seen a large drop in business. State officials were working Saturday on alternative sources of water that may allow restaurants to reopen.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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