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Ancient Stonehenge gets modern-day revamp

First Published Dec 17 2013 11:38AM      Last Updated Dec 17 2013 03:43 pm
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Stones for the second Stonehenge, much of which still stands, were brought from up to 175 miles (280 kilometers) away. Construction continued for centuries, and the site may have been a temple for Druid worship, a giant astronomical calendar or a place of healing.

Evidence suggests large crowds gathered at Stonehenge for the summer and winter solstices, a tradition that continues today. Thousands of self-styled Druids, pagans and New Age revelers are due to gather for the winter solstice on Saturday, the shortest day of the year in the northern hemisphere.

Senior curator Sara Lunt said there are still major discoveries to be made — more than half the site remains unexcavated. But the original purpose of Stonehenge may remain a mystery.



"We know there was a big idea" behind Stonehenge and other stone circles built across the British Isles in the Neolithic period, she said. But "what the spiritual dimension of this idea is — that is the key, and that is what we can’t get."

"We still have no way of replicating a Neolithic mind. We don’t have the Neolithic voice in our ear.

"We don’t know the heart of it — and that’s a good thing. That gives people work to do."

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Online: http://www.english-heritage.org.uk/daysout/properties/stonehenge/

Jill Lawless can be reached at http://Twitter.com/JillLawless

 

 

 

 

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