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House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., left, and Senate Budget Committee Chairwoman Patty Murray, D-Wash., announce a tentative agreement between Republican and Democratic negotiators on a government spending plan, at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 10, 2013. Negotiators reached the modest budget agreement to restore about $65 billion in automatic spending cuts from programs ranging from parks to the Pentagon, with votes expected in both houses by week's end. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
House Republicans signal support for budget deal
First Published Dec 11 2013 09:48 am • Last Updated Dec 11 2013 02:19 pm

Washington • House Republicans signaled support Wednesday for a budget deal worked out a day earlier, a plan narrowly drawn but promoted as a way to stabilize Congress’ erratic fiscal efforts, avert another government shutdown and mute some of the partisan rancor that has damaged Americans’ attitudes about their lawmakers.

"There’s a lot to like about it," said one GOP congressman, John Fleming of Louisiana, as he emerged from a closed-door caucus meeting.

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The plan provides $63 billion in short-term relief from painful automatic spending cuts and counters that with $85 billion in spending cuts and new fees over the coming decade. Congress is expected to enact the savings measure this year and follow up with a huge spending bill next month.

GOP critics faulted the measure for increasing deficits for the next three years and complained that much of its deficit savings would come near the end of its 10-year projections. An estimate by the Congressional Budget Office says that the deal would add $23 billion to the deficit for the ongoing 2014 budget year and add another $22.3 billion over the 2015-16 timeframe.

Fully $68 billion, or 80 percent, of the plan’s $85 billion in spending cuts and fees would come in the pact’s final three years. Just $11 billion would accrue in the first three years, an amount that’s far exceeded by new spending permitted this year and next.

Supporters insisted the plan, while imperfect, is at least a step in the right direction.

Rep. Jeff Miller, R-Fla., said most Republicans would back the deal worked out by Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., and Democratic Sen. Patty Murray — and applauded by the White House.

"A lot of folks will probably vote for it even though they would rather not support this type of legislation, but we have to get the spending issue completed so that there is some consistency in the future," Miller said.

The White House issued a statement Wednesday praising the bill for "critical investments in areas such as education, infrastructure, and scientific research, while keeping the Nation on the path to long-term deficit reduction."

The House plans to vote on the measure Thursday.


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There was some grumbling from both liberals and conservatives since the plan wouldn’t solve long-term tax and spending issues, and ignores expiring unemployment benefits.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., a potential 2016 presidential candidate, announced his opposition, saying that "undoing tens of billions of this modest spending restraint is shameful and must be opposed."

But House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, dismissed criticism from groups such as Heritage Action, which raise money as they disparage Republicans for being insufficiently conservative.

"They’re using our members and they’re using the American people to further their own goals," Boehner said Wednesday. "This is ridiculous."

But many House Democrats were less than enthusiastic, too.

"Stay tuned," said Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., when asked about whether Democrats would support the bill.

The agreement, among other things, seeks to restore $63 billion in automatic spending cuts affecting programs ranging from parks to the Pentagon. The deal to ease those cuts for two years is aimed less at chipping away at the nation’s $17 trillion national debt than it is at trying to help a dysfunctional Capitol stop lurching from crisis to crisis. It would set the stage for action in January on a $1 trillion-plus spending bill for the budget year that began in October.

The measure unveiled by Ryan and Murray blends $85 billion in spending cuts and revenue from new and extended fees — but no taxes or cuts to Medicare beneficiaries — to replace a significant amount of the mandated cuts to agency budgets over the coming two years.

The package would raise the Transportation Security Administration fee on a typical nonstop, round-trip airline ticket from $5 to $10; require newly hired federal workers to contribute 1.3 percentage points more of their salaries toward their pensions; and trim cost-of-living adjustments to the pensions of military retirees under the age of 62. Hospitals and other health care providers would have to absorb two additional years of a 2-percentage-point cut in their Medicare reimbursements.

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., said the measure will serve as a vehicle to delay a 24 percent cut in Medicare reimbursements to physicians that would otherwise take effect Jan. 1 The idea is to buy negotiators more time to try to permanently fix the problem, which dates to miscalculations enacted in a 1997 budget law.

The plan doesn’t attempt to resuscitate earlier attempts at an accommodation that would have traded tax hikes for structural curbs to ever-growing benefit programs like Medicare and Social Security. But it would at least bring some stability on the budget to an institution — Congress — whose approval ratings are in the gutter.

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