Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Will 16 days of shutdown change anything?


< Previous Page


Obama says it showed just how many things, large and small, the government does to help people.

Conservatives saw the opposite lesson — that federal workers can disappear without being missed.

Photos
Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

There’s some evidence for both ideas.

Lots of people were inconvenienced and some lives were seriously disrupted, but most Americans weren’t personally touched by the shutdown. Less than one-third said someone in their home was affected, according to an NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll conducted Oct. 7-9.

That doesn’t mean they shrugged off the effects beyond their front door.

About two-thirds in that poll felt the shutdown was harming the economy. Consumer confidence dropped to its lowest level in more than a year, according to Gallup polling.

The economy

Forget turkey dinners and sleigh bells in the snow. Washington’s new tradition is scaring holiday shoppers.

Last year politicians slowed sales by hanging the threat of a "fiscal cliff" over the holiday season, before working out a deal in the new year.


story continues below
story continues below

This year, the government shutdown already has taken a toll. Economists and Standard & Poor’s estimate that it cost the economy $24 billion, or about $75 for every U.S. resident.

Consumers may stay worried, especially if they hear bad news from Republican and Democratic lawmakers who are meeting over the next two months in hopes of reaching a spending deal to avert another fiscal standoff in January.

America’s image

Sure, it’s embarrassing. America’s image took a hit. Other countries are snickering.

Obama says the latest spectacle depressed the nation’s friends and heartened its enemies. But it shouldn’t have surprised them much. The world has witnessed three years of stalemates and standoffs between Democrats and Republicans since the GOP won control of the House in 2010.

In the long view, the U.S. reputation, and especially its appeal for investors, doesn’t dent easily. After all, where else can the world park its money? Treasury bonds have scant competition as the safest place to stash reserves.

The latest brouhaha should fade quickly because it stopped short of the feared outcome — a default on Treasury bonds that would tarnish their spotless image.

If that threat remerges in January, the world will be watching.

Health care law

Next Page >


Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.