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Will 16 days of shutdown change anything?

First Published Oct 20 2013 06:43PM      Last Updated Oct 21 2013 09:07 am

Washington • Sixteen days in October could change everything, or not much at all.

Will the partial government shutdown prove to be the turning point after three years of partisan skirmishing in Washington? Or was it just a halftime show to fire up the players?

With federal employees back at work for now, lawmakers are getting a chance to find a compromise on spending cuts and settle their vast differences. If they fail, they risk a repeat shutdown in mid-January, followed a few weeks later by the recurring danger of the government defaulting on its debts.

A look at where things stand after the shutdown:



The players

• President Barack Obama won a round by refusing to back down. The public didn’t applaud his handling of the crisis, but scored congressional Republicans even lower. Obama’s overall approval rating held steady, and so did the nation’s divided opinion of his health care law. He strengthened his hand for next time.

• House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, conceded a loss for his party. But personally he came out OK. Boehner placated his boisterous tea party-backed members by letting them take a doomed stand against the health law, then got credit for finally allowing the shutdown to end on mostly Democratic votes.

• Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, made a name for himself by leading the tea party charge toward shutdown. About half of the respondents in a recent Associated Press-GfK poll knew enough about Cruz to form an opinion — impressive for a senator elected less than a year ago. The bad news for Cruz? Their opinion was negative by a 2-1 margin.

• Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky is catching heat for helping reopen the government. McConnell agrees with many of his fellow GOP senators that the shutdown was bad strategy and must not be repeated. That puts him on the wrong side of the party’s tea party wing, and a tea party-backed candidate is challenging McConnell in the primary for his Senate seat.

Tea party

The tea party, billed as a movement of the people, is getting slammed in national polls. Democrats say its belligerent tactics have been discredited. Much of the Republican establishment agrees.

Tea party lawmakers don’t care.

Tea party favorites in Congress are more focused on the opinions of voters back home, their big money supporters and outside groups, such as Heritage Action, that influence elections.

Cruz, criticized by many fellow Republicans for fomenting the standoff, says he’s content to be "reviled in Washington, D.C., and appreciated in Texas."

Cruz says he remains as determined as ever.

"I would do anything, and I will continue to do anything I can," he said, "to stop the train wreck that is Obamacare."

 

 

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