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Cash-strapped governments turn to special districts

Published October 3, 2013 11:56 am

This is an archived article that was published on sltrib.com in 2013, and information in the article may be outdated. It is provided only for personal research purposes and may not be reprinted.

Voters were upset about how much so-called "special districts" were costing them. "People said, 'My sanitation district has raised my rates 60 percent,'" Edelen said. "When I went and asked the county executives about it, I got: 'They don't work for me.'"

Cash-strapped governments turn to special districts

David Hartman of Colorado's Pagosa Fire Protection District pauses while fighting a wildfire last August. Special districts, such as fire protection districts, have proliferated as cash-strapped local governments have looked to them to provide services. (AP)Kentucky state Auditor Adam Edelen used a standard icebreaker when he met voters during his 2011 campaign: "Who's cheating you?"A common theme quickly emerged. Voters were upset about how much so-called "special districts" were costing them. "People said, 'My sanitation district has raised my rates ...

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