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(Chris Schneider | The Associated Press) Eric Machmuller, front left, and Pat Machmuller, rear left, lead a boat down a residential street to help residents gather pets and belongings from their flooded homes in Longmont, Colo., on Saturday. Floodwaters have affected a 4,500 square-mile section of the state. National Guard helicopters have been evacuating residents from the hardest hit communities.
Floods transform Colorado’s ‘Gore-Tex Vortex’
First Published Sep 15 2013 03:36 pm • Last Updated Sep 15 2013 03:43 pm

LYONS, Colo. • The cars that normally clog Main Street in Lyons on the way to Rocky Mountain National Park have been replaced by military supply trucks. Shop owners in Estes Park hurriedly cleared their wares in fear that the Big Thompson River will rise again. A plywood sign encouraged residents mucking out their homes to "Hang in there."

Days of rain and floods have transformed the outdoorsy mountain communities in Colorado’s Rocky Mountain foothills affectionately known "The Gore-Tex Vortex" from a paradise into a disaster area with little in the way of supplies or services — and more rain falling Sunday.

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The string of communities from Boulder to Estes Park, the gateway to Rocky Mountain National Park, is a base for backpackers and nature lovers where blue-collar and yuppie sensibilities exist side by side. Now, roadways have crumbled, scenic bridges are destroyed, the site of the bluegrass festival is washed out and most shops are closed.

Chris Rodes, one of Lyons’ newest residents, said the change is so drastic that he is considering moving away just two weeks after settling there.

"It’s not the same," Rodes said. "All these beautiful places, it’s just brown mud."

Estes Park town administrator Frank Lancaster said visitors who would normally flock there during the golden September days should stay away for at least a month, but it could take a year or longer for many of the mountain roadways to be repaired.

Meanwhile, people were still trapped, the nearby hamlet of Glen Haven has been "destroyed" and the continuing rain threatened a new round of flooding, he said.

"We are all crossing our fingers and praying" he said.

The residents who remained or began trickling back — if they were allowed to do so — were left to watch out for one another. Restaurateurs and grocers in Lyons were distributing food to their neighbors as others arrived in groups carrying supplies.

Scott Martin, 25, drove the half-hour from Boulder Saturday to deliver drinking water and gasoline to a friend’s parents. He fled Lyons amid a torrential downpour on Wednesday night after the mountain stream that cuts through town gushed into his basement.


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Martin grew up tubing down the river and hiking the mountains, and like many residents, he still jumps in the water after work. Looking into the cottonwood and aspen trees at the outskirts of town, he wondered when he would be able to do those things again.

"Best case, it’s just mud everywhere; in everyone’s yard and all the streets," he said.

From the mountain communities east to the plains city of Fort Morgan, numerous pockets of individuals remained cut off by the flooding. Sunday’s rain hampered the helicopter searches, and rescuers trekked by ground up dangerous canyon roads to reach some of those homes isolated since Wednesday.

The surging waters have been deadly, with four people confirmed dead and two more missing and presumed dead after their homes were swept away.

Hundreds of people have still not been heard from, but with phone service being restored to some of the areas over the weekend, officials hoped that number would drop as they contacted more stranded people.

In Estes Park, some 20 miles from Lyons, hundreds of homes and cabins were empty. High water still covered several low-lying streets. Where the river had receded, it had left behind up to a foot of mud.

Ironically, the massive Estes Ark — a three-story former toy store designed to look like Noah’s Ark — was high and dry.

"I don’t know if it’s open anymore, but soon it’s going to be our only way out," joked Carly Blankfein.

Supplies of gas and groceries had been running low until Route 7 was recently reopened. On Sunday, people were lined up at the one gas station where a tanker had arrived.

At the Aspen and Evergreen Gallery along the town’s main street next to the Big Thompson River, owner Tamara Jarolimek was clearing out the shop Sunday in fear that the new wave of rain would cause another surge.

"We only have limited time to get out as much as we can," she said.

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