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FILE - This Aug. 23, 2011, file photo, provided by the Defense Video & Imagery Distribution System shows Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales during an exercise at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, Calif. Bales, a U.S. soldier charged in the killing of 16 Afghan villagers, pleaded guilty in June in a deal with prosecutors to avoid the death penalty. His sentencing is scheduled to begin Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2013 with the selection of a military jury. (AP Photo/DVIDS, Spc. Ryan Hallock, File)
Staff Sgt. Bales apologizes for Afghan massacre
First Published Aug 22 2013 07:12 pm • Last Updated Aug 22 2013 07:12 pm

Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Wash. • The U.S. soldier who massacred 16 Afghan civilians during pre-dawn raids last year apologized for the first time for his "act of cowardice," but could not explain the atrocities to a military jury considering whether he should one day have a shot at freedom.

Staff Sgt. Robert Bales said he would bring back the victims of his March 11, 2012, attack "in a heartbeat," if possible.

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"I’m truly, truly sorry to those people whose families got taken away," he said in a mostly steady voice. "I can’t comprehend their loss. I think about it every time I look at my kids."

Bales, 40, did not recount specifics of the horrors, but described the killings as an "act of cowardice, behind a mask of fear, bullshit and bravado."

He said he hoped his words would be translated for the nine villagers who traveled from Afghanistan to testify against him — none of whom elected to be in court to hear his words.

The father of two from Lake Tapps, Wash., was serving his fourth combat deployment when he left his outpost at Camp Belambay, in Kandahar Province, in the middle of the night to attack two villages, exhibiting an unimaginable brutality as he slaughtered men, women and children screaming for his mercy.

He pleaded guilty in June, and the six-member jury is deciding whether his life sentence should include the chance of parole.

His attorneys previously made much of Bales’ repeated deployments and suggested that post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury may have played a role in the killings. But they offered no testimony from psychiatrists or other doctors, saying they saw little point in making the case a battle of the experts.

Instead, they rested their defense after Bales finished speaking Thursday. Closing arguments were scheduled Friday morning.

Saying he was nervous to address the court, Bales sat at the witness stand and answered questions from one of his defense attorneys, Emma Scanlan, as his wife cried in the front row of the courtroom. Bales himself briefly became emotional, especially choking up as he apologized to his fellow soldiers.


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"I love the Army, I’ve stood next to some really good guys, some real heroes," he said. "I can’t say I’m sorry to those guys enough.

"Nothing makes it right," he added. "So many times before I’ve asked myself. I don’t know why. Sorry just isn’t good enough. I’m sorry."

His statements were not made under oath, which prevented prosecutors from cross-examining him.

Bales described in detail the trouble he had readjusting to civilian life after his deployments to Iraq. He became angry all the time, he said, and he was mad at himself for that.

"Normal course of life became hard in that, you know, waiting in traffic, terrible," he said. "Certain smells would just drive me nuts. Washing the dishes I’d just be mad about, for no reason."

He began drinking heavily, hiding bottles and sleeping pills from his wife. He fleetingly began to see a counselor, but quit because he didn’t think it was working and he didn’t want others to find him weak.

His perpetual rage worsened as he deployed to Afghanistan in late 2011, taking steroids while there. He lashed out frequently at junior soldiers, he said, in ways he’s now embarrassed about.

Bales said he spent almost the entire day before the murders venting his anger by chopping and sawing a large tree that the soldiers had taken down near the base.

Bales’ lawyers tried to paint a sympathetic picture of the soldier to contrast his own admissions and the testimony of angry Afghan villagers about the horror he wrought.

Former pro football player Marc Edwards testified Thursday as a character witness, telling jurors he remembered Bales as a great leader from their high school days in Norwood, Ohio.

Wearing the Super Bowl ring he won with the New England Patriots in 2002, Edwards said the slightly older Bales "took me under his wing" and was magnanimous when Edwards took his position at starting linebacker.

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