Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
U.S. House votes to delay core parts of health care law


< Previous Page


Under the health law, companies with 50 or more workers must provide affordable coverage to their full-time employees or risk a series of escalating tax penalties if just one worker ends up getting government-subsidized insurance. Originally, that requirement was supposed to take effect Jan. 1. It will now be delayed to 2015.

The administration said businesses had raised concerns about the complexity of the requirements and pressed for more time for implementation. According to the Kaiser Family Foundation, 95 percent of employers with 50 or more workers already offer health benefits.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

Elsewhere on Capitol Hill, senior administration officials defended the law and the delay.

Treasury Department health policy adviser Mark Iwry told the Ways and Means Committee that the administration’s one-year delay of the requirement for larger employers to offer coverage was in keeping with the agency’s longstanding legal authority to smooth the implementation of complicated new tax laws.

"On a number of prior occasions across administrations, this authority has been used to postpone the application of new legislation when immediate application would have subjected taxpayers to unreasonable administrative burdens or costs," Iwry said.

He cited a number of previous examples, from small business legislation to a tax on aviation fuel.

The inspector general’s office that monitors the Internal Revenue Service warned of possible problems for consumers submitting applications for health insurance in October.

Testifying before the House Oversight committee, Alan Duncan of the Treasury’s Inspector General office said the rush to be ready for open enrollment Oct. 1 may leave some technology not fully tested.

"The lack of adequate testing could result in significant delays and errors in accepting and processing ... applications for health insurance coverage," Duncan testified.

Administration officials said they are highly confident of a successful launch.


story continues below
story continues below

———

Associated Press writers Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Jim Kuhnhenn contributed to this report.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.