Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
FILE - House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, in this July 11, 2013 file photo. Boehner stood on the House floor Tuesday July 16, 2013 and ridiculed Democratic comments that the law has been "wonderful" for the country saying "The law isn't wonderful, it's a train wreck. You know it. I know it. And the American people know it. Even the president knows it. That's why he proposed delaying his mandate on employers." The House has scheduled votes Wednesday to delay the health care law's individual and employer mandates, the 38th time the GOP majority has tried to eliminate, defund or scale back the program since Republicans took control of the House in January 2011. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
U.S. House votes to delay core parts of health care law
First Published Jul 17 2013 06:40 pm • Last Updated Jul 17 2013 06:44 pm

Washington • The Republican-led House voted on Wednesday to delay core provisions of President Barack Obama’s health care law, emboldened by the administration’s concession that requiring companies to provide coverage for their workers next year may be too complicated.

After a day of heated rhetoric, the House voted largely along party lines, 264-161, to delay by one year the so-called employer mandate of the Affordable Care Act. It voted 251-174 to extend a similar grace period to virtually all Americans who will be required to obtain coverage beginning Jan. 1, the linchpin of the law.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

The dual political-show votes marked the 38th time the GOP majority has tried to eliminate, defund or scale back the unpopular law since Republicans took control of the House in January 2011. The House legislation stands no chance in the Democratic-run Senate.

The goal of the health care law is to provide coverage to nearly 50 million Americans without health insurance and lower skyrocketing costs. But in the three years since Obama signed his signature law, the public remains highly skeptical and the administration’s abrupt decision earlier this month to delay the employer provision only fueled more doubts.

Republican foes welcomed the deferment as a political gift, not only to assail Obama but to arrange votes that put House Democrats on record ahead of next year’s congressional elections. In fact, on the employer mandate, 35 Democrats broke with party leaders and joined Republicans in backing the delay. Twenty-two Democrats supported a postponement of the health care requirement for individuals.

"This administration cannot make its own law work," said Rep. Dave Camp, R-Mich., chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, during House debate.

Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., said the decision was "a clear signal that even the administration doesn’t believe the country is ready to sustain the painful economic impact this law will have."

Eager to counter the Republican criticism, Obama plans to deliver remarks Thursday focusing on rebates that consumers are already receiving from insurance companies under the health care law.

White House spokesman Jay Carney said Obama will draw attention to the 8.5 million consumers who have received an average consumer rebate of about $100. Carney also highlighted reports that some states are already anticipating lower premiums under the Affordable Care Act.

"Competition and transparency in the marketplaces, plus the hard effort by those committed to making the law work, are leading to affordable, new and better choices for families," Carney said.


story continues below
story continues below

The House vote delaying the employer requirement codified the administration’s decision, but the White House insisted it was unnecessary and issued a tough veto threat. Democrats dismissed the entire GOP effort as just another fruitless attack on a law that has been upheld by the Supreme Court.

"Well, here we go again. Another repeal vote, another political side show," said Rep. Sander Levin, D-Mich.

Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi said it was "nothing more than a waste of time" as the health care issue has been settled in Congress, the courts and in last year’s presidential election when Obama won a second term.

In a series of unconventional political arguments, Republicans faulted Obama, who taught courses in constitutional law, of selectively enforcing the law. They accused a Democratic president of siding with business while ignoring the needs of average Americans.

"Let’s provide the same relief to American families that Obama’s promised to big business," said Rep. Todd Young, R-Ind.

Republicans also read aloud the complaints of union leaders about the unintended consequences of the law on workers’ hours, with companies scaling back work time to avoid providing health coverage. They gleefully cited labor’s statement that it voted for Democrats and expected them to address the problem.

The unions — International Brotherhood of Teamsters, the United Food and Commercial Workers International Union and UNITE-HERE — wrote to Democratic leaders last week that the law’s requirements have created an incentive for employers to limit workers’ hours.

The law created a new definition of full-time workers, those putting in 30 hours or more.

"Time is running out: Congress wrote this law; we voted for you. We have a problem; you need to fix it. The unintended consequences of the ACA (Affordable Care Act) are severe. Perverse incentives are already creating nightmare scenarios," the union leaders wrote.

House Democrats argued that the criticisms ignore the immediate advantages of the law, millions of young people who are able to remain on their parents’ health care until age 26, preventives services and the millions of Americans who will have access to affordable care.

After each Republican spoke during House debate, Democrats described the specific benefits of the law in the GOP lawmaker’s district.

Next Page >


Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.