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Riverside County Sheriff's deputies have closed Helen Lane Wednesday, July 10, 2013, in Menifee, Calif. Authorities in Southern California searched for possible human remains Wednesday at the home of an 11-year-old autistic boy who disappeared over the weekend. (AP Photo/The Press-Enterprise, Frank Bellino) NO SALES; MAGS OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT
Woman: ‘Visions’ led her to dead California boy
First Published Jul 12 2013 04:12 pm • Last Updated Jul 12 2013 07:27 pm

Santa Ana, Calif. • Pam Ragland was watching a TV report about the search for an 11-year-old California boy missing in a rural town miles away when she felt something wasn’t right.

Ragland began crying and then a haunting vision popped into her head: A young boy lying on his side with his eyes closed.

At a glance

California boy’s half brother charged with murder

Prosecutors have filed a murder charge against a Southern California teen in the death of his 11-year-old half brother, who was the subject of an intense search.

Riverside County District Attorney spokesman John Hall said Friday the charge against the 16-year-old suspect was filed in juvenile court. But he says prosecutors will ask a judge at a Monday hearing to determine if the case should be transferred to adult court.

The Associated Press is withholding the suspect’s name because of his age.

Terry Dewayne Smith Jr.’s body was found Wednesday in a shallow grave under a tree behind the house he shared with his mother, half brother and other family.

His mother reported him missing Sunday, and a search lasted four days.

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The boy, Terry Dewayne Smith Jr., wasn’t sleeping — and by the time Ragland’s visions stopped, she had led detectives to his decomposing body behind his house in the Riverside County community of Menifee.

The remains had been partially buried in a shallow grave under a tree more than 60 miles from Ragland’s Orange County home.

Authorities on Friday decided to charge the boy’s 16-year-old half-brother with murder. The teen is due in juvenile court on Monday, and prosecutors have requested a hearing to determine if he should be tried as an adult.

The Associated Press is not naming the suspect because he is a juvenile.

Detectives acknowledged it was a bizarre way to find the boy’s body, and they are investigating whether Ragland had anything to do with the death.

Ragland, 50, said she relies on intuition to see things that others don’t.

"It was just his recurrent picture that was in my head that never changed," she said. "I was getting a snapshot but I couldn’t understand why he wasn’t moving. He had his eyes closed, but I just thought he was sleeping."

Sgt. Lisa McConnell, a Riverside County sheriff’s spokeswoman, confirmed that Ragland called in the tip that led them to the body, but she would not comment further. An investigation to rule out Ragland’s possible involvement in the crime was ongoing, McConnell said.


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"In terms of any kinds of abilities that she has, I can’t confirm that," McConnell said.

A detective involved in the search, however, said he was impressed with the discovery.

"She actually went right up the driveway of the house, onto the property, and right up to the body of this boy," Riverside County sheriff’s Detective John Powers told KFI-AM radio, which was first media outlet to get officials to confirm her account.

"Not in 23 years have I ever seen anything like this," Powers said.

Powers did not return a call by The Associated Press.

At first, Ragland didn’t want to get involved but said she couldn’t ignore the images that kept coming back to her.

She saw a dirt road, a distinctive building that looked like a hay barn, and a single tree standing alone. She saw a dark night with city lights in the distance.

She called the tip line Tuesday and a sergeant directed her to the sheriff’s command center in Menifee, more than an hour’s drive away. She piled her kids — a 10-year-old son and a 12-year-old daughter — into her car.

By the time they reached the town 80 miles southeast of Los Angeles, it was pitch black and the third day of a massive search was winding down for the night.

Ragland had a powerful sensation as she pulled into the gravel parking lot of the rustic market was serving as an impromptu search headquarters.

"I literally physically turned my body all the way around like a compass and I looked at the store ... and I said, ‘He’s back there,’" she recalled.

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