Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
FILE - In this May 30, 2013 file photo provided by the Murnaghan family, Sarah Murnaghan, left, lies in her hospital bed next to adopted sister Ella on the 100th day of her stay in Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Murnaghen, whose efforts to qualify for an organ donation drew public debate over how donated lungs are allocated was getting a transplant Wednesday, June 12, 2013, at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, her family said. (AP Photo/Murnaghan Family, File)
Pennsylvania girl’s double-lung transplant deemed success
First Published Jun 12 2013 06:21 pm • Last Updated Jun 12 2013 06:46 pm

Philadelphia • A 10-year-old girl whose efforts to qualify for an organ donation spurred public debate over how organs are allocated underwent a successful double-lung transplant on Wednesday, a family spokeswoman said.

Sarah Murnaghan, who suffers from severe cystic fibrosis, received new lungs from an adult donor at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, spokeswoman Tracy Simon said.

Photos
Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

The Murnaghan family said it was "thrilled" to share the news that Sarah was out of surgery.

"Her doctors are very pleased with both her progress during the procedure and her prognosis for recovery," the family said in a statement.

During double-lung transplants, surgeons must open up the patient’s chest. Complications can include rejection of the new lungs and infection.

Sarah went into surgery around 11 a.m. Wednesday, and the procedure lasted about six hours, her family said.

"The surgeons had no challenges resizing and transplanting the donor lungs — the surgery went smoothly, and Sarah did extremely well," it said.

Sarah’s family and the family of another cystic fibrosis patient at the same hospital challenged transplant policy that made children under 12 wait for pediatric lungs to become available or be offered lungs donated by adults only after adolescents and adults on the waiting list had been considered. They said pediatric lungs are rarely donated.

Sarah’s health was deteriorating when a judge intervened in her case last week, giving her a chance at the much larger list of organs from adult donors. U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson ruled June 5 that Sarah and 11-year-old Javier Acosta, of New York City, should be eligible for adult lungs.

Critics warned there could be a downside to having judges intervene in the organ transplant system’s established procedures. Lung transplants are difficult procedures, and some experts say child patients tend to have more trouble with them than adults do.


story continues below
story continues below

No other details about the donor lungs are known, including whether they came through the regular donor system or through public appeals.

Sarah’s relatives, who are from Newtown Square, just west of Philadelphia, were "beyond excited" about her new lungs but were "keeping in mind that someone had to lose a family member and they’re very aware of that and very appreciative," family spokeswoman Maureen Garrity said earlier Wednesday.

The Murnaghan family received word about the donor lungs Tuesday night, Garrity said.

Sarah’s mother, Janet Murnaghan, said in a Facebook post that the family was "overwhelmed with emotions" and thanked all her supporters. She said the donor’s family "has experienced a tremendous loss, may God grant them a peace that surpasses understanding."

The national organization that manages organ transplants, the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network, added Sarah to the adult waiting list after the judge’s ruling. Her transplant came two days before a hearing was scheduled on the family’s request for a broader injunction.

The network has said 31 children under age 11 are on the waiting list for a lung transplant. Its executive committee held an emergency meeting this week but resisted making emergency rule changes for children under 12 who are waiting on lungs, instead creating a special appeal and review system to hear such cases.

Sarah’s family "did have a legitimate complaint" about the rule that limited her access to adult lungs, said medical ethicist Arthur Caplan, of the NYU Langone Medical Center in New York.

"When the transplant community met, they didn’t want to change that rule without really thinking carefully about it," he said. The appeals process that was established this week, he said, was "built on evidence, not on influence."

He added: "In general, the road to a transplant is still to let the system decide who will do best with scarce, lifesaving organs. And it’s important that people understand that money, visibility, being photogenic ... are factors that have to be kept to a minimum if we’re going to get the best use out of the scarce supply of donated cadaver organs."

———

AP Science Writer Malcolm Ritter reported from New York.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.