Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Search for Oklahoma tornado survivors nearly complete


< Previous Page


Also visible were large patches of red earth where the tornado scoured the land down to the soil. Some tree trunks were still standing, but the winds ripped away their leaves, limbs and bark.

In revising its estimate of the storm’s power, the National Weather Service said the tornado had winds of at least 200 mph and was on the ground for 40 minutes.

At a glance

Miles and minutes: Oklahoma tornado by the numbers

An exceptionally devastating tornado hit the Oklahoma City suburb of Moore on Monday afternoon, twisting through subdivisions and across a highway, leaving debris and confusion in its wake. Some of the storm’s effects can be measured in numbers:

24 » The number of dead, including at least 9 children

More than 200 » Injured, including dozens of children

200-plus » Responders searched overnight for survivors

2 » Number of schools damaged, Plaza Towers Elementary in Moore and Briarwood in Oklahoma City

16 » Minutes between when National Weather Service issued a tornado warning at 2:40 p.m. and when the tornado touched down in Newcastle, Okla., about 12 miles southwest of Moore

40 » Minutes the tornado was on the ground, from 2:56 p.m. CDT to 3:36 p.m. CDT

17 » Miles tornado traveled

1.3 miles » Width of tornado at points

200-210 mph » Estimated maximum wind speed

5,131 » Days since the May 3, 1999, tornado in Moore, which followed the same route as Monday’s tornado. More than 4 dozen people died in that storm, and 600 homes were damaged.

Sources: Emergency officials in Moore, Okla., and the National Severe Storm Lab in Norman, Okla.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

The agency upgraded the tornado from an EF4 on the enhanced Fujita scale based on reports from a damage-assessment team, said spokeswoman Keli Pirtle. Monday’s twister was at least a half-mile wide. It was the nation’s first EF5 tornado of 2013.

Other search-and-rescue teams concentrated on Plaza Towers Elementary, where the storm ripped off the roof, knocked down walls and destroyed the playground as students and teachers huddled in hallways and bathrooms.

Seven of the nine dead children were killed at the school, but several students were pulled alive from under a collapsed wall and other heaps of mangled debris. Rescue workers passed the survivors down a human chain of parents and neighborhood volunteers. Parents carried children in their arms to a triage center in the parking lot. Some students looked dazed, others terrified.

Neither Plaza Towers nor another school in Oklahoma City that was not as severely damaged had reinforced storm shelters, or safe rooms, said Albert Ashwood is director of the Oklahoma Department of Emergency Management.

More than 100 schools across the state do have safe rooms, he said, explaining that it’s up to each jurisdiction to set spending priorities.

Ashwood said a shelter would not necessarily have saved more lives at Plaza Towers.

"When you talk about any kind of safety measures ... it’s a mitigating measure, it’s not an absolute," he told reporters. "There’s not a guarantee that everyone will be totally safe."

Officials were still trying to account for a handful of children not found at the school who may have gone home early with their parents, Bird said.


story continues below
story continues below

On the streets of Moore, evidence of the storm’s fury stretched in every direction: Roofs were torn off houses, exposing metal rods left twisted like pretzels. Cars sat in heaps, crumpled and sprayed with caked-on mud. Insulation and siding was piled up against any walls still standing. Yards were littered with pieces of wood, nails and pieces of electric poles.

President Barack Obama pledged to provide federal help and mourned the death of young children who were killed while "trying to take shelter in the safest place they knew — their school."

The town of Moore "needs to get everything it needs right away," he said Tuesday.

Moore has been one of the fastest-growing suburbs of Oklahoma City, attracting middle-income families and young couples looking for stable schools and affordable housing. The town’s population has grown over the last decade as developers built subdivisions for people who wanted to avoid the urban problems and schools of Oklahoma City but couldn’t afford pricier Norman, the college town next door.

Many residents commute to jobs in Oklahoma City or to Tinker Air Force Base, about 20 minutes away.



Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.