Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts

Relatives say Cleveland kidnapping suspect had violent streak
First Published May 10 2013 02:30 pm • Last Updated May 10 2013 02:32 pm

CLEVELAND • The mannequin was life-sized, with a mop-like wig and creepy, slanted eyes. Ariel Castro kept it propped against a wall of his house and liked to use it to scare people. Sometimes he drove around town with it in the back seat of his car.

"He threatened me lots of times with it," said Castro’s nephew, 26-year-old Angel Caraballo, who was terrified of his uncle as a little boy and unnerved by him as an adult. "He would say: ‘Act up again, you’ll be in that back room with the mannequin.’"

Photos

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

Castro installed padlocks on every door leading into his dilapidated home on Seymour Avenue. He kept the basement bolted shut, too. When relatives showed up at his front door, he made them wait for half an hour before emerging, and nobody was ever allowed past the living room.

"He had told me to stay in the kitchen," said Elida Marie Caraballo, Castro’s niece, who was at his house about seven years ago with Castro’s daughter Rosie. "I didn’t know why."

In the days since Castro’s arrest on charges of keeping three women imprisoned in his home for a decade, relatives and acquaintances have sketched a portrait of him as a man with a twisted sense of humor, a compulsion for secrecy and a towering, terrifying rage that led him to savagely beat, torment and control his common-law wife, Grimilda Figueroa.

He was a "monster," they said.

The image stands starkly at odds with the picture drawn by some neighbors, fellow musicians and others. They described the former school bus driver as an affable guy who played bass in a merengue band and rode motorcycles around town.

"You can talk to him and you think he’s a nice guy," said Frank Caraballo, Castro’s brother-in-law. "I think it was a female thing. He was really controlling with females. You know, he didn’t want no one to touch his daughters. He wanted to know everything his wife did."

Castro, 52, is being held in jail on $8 million bail under a suicide watch, charged with rape and kidnapping. Prosecutors said they plan to bring additional counts, possibly including murder charges punishable by death for allegedly forcing at least one of his pregnant captives to miscarry over and over again by starving her and punching her in the belly.

A DNA test confirmed Friday that he fathered the now 6-year-old girl born to one of the women while in captivity.


story continues below
story continues below

Castro was represented in court on Thursday by public defender Kathleen Demetz, who said she is acting as Castro’s adviser if needed until he is appointed a full-time attorney. She said Friday that she can’t speak to his guilt or innocence and that she advised him not to give any news interviews that might jeopardize his case.

Figueroa left Castro years ago and died last year after a long illness. During their early years together, Castro worked in a plastics factory and treated his wife well, relatives said. But after their first child was born, they said, something snapped in him.

He beat Figueroa relentlessly, her relatives said. They said he pushed her down the stairs, fractured her ribs, broke her nose several times, cracked a tooth and dislocated both shoulders. Once, he shoved Figueroa into a cardboard box and closed the flaps over her head, they said.

Figueroa filed domestic-violence complaints accusing Castro of threatening many times to kill her and her daughters. She charged that he frequently abducted the children and kept them from her, even though she had full custody, with no visitation rights for Castro.

He kept his wife and children imprisoned, cut off from friends and family, according to relatives. Figueroa couldn’t even unlock her own front door, they said.

"When I go over there to visit her, and I ask her, ‘Nilda, I’m here, open the door,’ she’s like, ‘I can’t. Ariel has the key,’" Elida Caraballo recalled.

Castro forbade Figueroa to use the telephone, relatives said. After warning her not to leave, he would test her to see if she obeyed.

"He would go creeping downstairs, not telling her that he’s home, spying on her," Caraballo said. "See who she’s calling. Next thing you know, he’ll pop upstairs."

One day, Figueroa was returning home with her arms full of groceries when Castro jumped into the doorway with the mannequin, frightening her so badly that she fell backward and smashed her head on the pavement, Caraballo said.

The mind games are echoed in the police report this week on the escape of the three women held at his home. According to the report, their big break came when Amanda Berry, 27, discovered that the main door was unlocked, leaving only a bolted screen door between her and freedom.

But she feared it was a test: Castro occasionally left a door unlocked to test them, Berry said. But she called to neighbors on a porch for help and was able to squeeze through.

Next Page >


Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.