Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts
Police officers arrive to a memorial service for fallen Massachusetts Institute of Technology campus officer Sean Collier at MIT in Cambridge, Mass. Wednesday, April 24, 2013. Authorities say Collier was killed by the Boston Marathon bombing suspects last Thursday, April 18. He had worked for the department a little more than a year. (AP Photo/Elise Amendola)
Murdered MIT officer memorialized as more Boston bombing details emerge
First Published Apr 24 2013 11:28 am • Last Updated Apr 24 2013 06:26 pm

BOSTON • As bagpipes wailed, more than 4,000 mourners paid their respects Wednesday to an MIT police officer who authorities say was ambushed in his cruiser by the Boston Marathon bombers, while U.S. investigators trying to get to the bottom of the plot looked for answers from the Tsarnaev brothers’ parents in Russia.

In other developments:

At a glance

Police: No evidence Boston suspects targeted NY

New York City Police Commissioner Raymond Kelly says there is no evidence that the Boston Marathon bombing suspects were targeting New York. But he says one may have been planning to party in the city after the attack.

Kelly said Wednesday that 19-year-old Dzhokhar Tsarnaev traveled to New York at least once last fall. There is a photo of the suspect in Times Square but no evidence that he was looking at possible targets.

Kelly says he was told Tsarnaev may have been intending to come to New York to party, or for a party, sometime after the bombings. But Kelly said it’s not clear if any specific plans were made.

The commissioner says the information was gleaned through interviews with the suspect.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

— The bombs were detonated by remote control, according to U.S. officials close to the investigation who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss it publicly. It was not clear what the detonation device was, but the charges against surviving suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev say he was using a cellphone moments before the blasts.

— Tsarnaev told interrogators that he and his brother were angry about the U.S. wars in Muslim Afghanistan and Iraq, officials speaking on condition of anonymity said.

— In a sign of how things were slowly and painfully getting back to normal in Boston, the area around the finish line on Boylston Street reopened nine days after the tragedy, freshly poured cement still drying on the repaired sidewalk.

— On Capitol Hill, lawmakers are asking whether a failure to share intelligence contributed to the bombings April 15 that killed three people and wounded more than 260.

MIT students, faculty and staff, law enforcement officials from across the nation and Vice President Joe Biden gathered on the campus in Cambridge to remember Sean Collier, a MIT officer who authorities say was gunned down by Dzhokhar and Tamerlan Tsarnaev three days after the bombing.

The line of mourners stretched for a half-mile, and they had to make their way through tight security, including metal detectors and bomb-sniffing dogs. Boston native James Taylor sang "The Water is Wide" and led a sing-along of "Shower the People."

Biden called the bombing suspects "two twisted, perverted, cowardly, knockoff jihadis." And he warned that terrorists attack the U.S. to try to force it to "jettison what we value most in the world: our open society, our system of justice that guarantees freedom."

Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, 19, was listed in fair condition as he recovered from wounds suffered in a getaway attempt last week. He could face the death penalty if convicted of plotting with his older brother to set off the shrapnel-packed pressure-cooker bombs that ripped through the crowd at the race. His 26-year-old brother died in a shootout last week.


story continues below
story continues below

Many Boylston Street businesses — banks, restaurants, gyms — remained closed. But a nearby Starbucks opened for the first time and allowed customers to retrieve purses, cellphones and school bags left behind as they fled in fear.

"I don’t think there’s going to be a sense of normalcy for a while," said Tom Champoux, who works a few blocks away, as he pointed to the cement and boarded-up windows. "There are scars here that will be with us for a long time."

U.S. investigators traveled to the predominantly Muslim province of Dagestan in southern Russia and were in contact with the brothers’ parents, hoping to shed light on the attack.

The parents, Anzor Tsarnaev and Zubeidat Tsarnaeva, plan to fly to the U.S. on Thursday, the father was quoted as telling the Russian state news agency RIA Novosti. The family has said it wants to bring Tamerlan’s body back to Russia.

Investigators are looking into whether Tamerlan, who spent six months in Russia’s turbulent Caucasus region in 2012, was influenced by the religious extremists who have waged an insurgency against Russian forces in the area for years. The brothers have roots in Dagestan and neighboring Chechnya but had lived in the U.S. for about a decade.

After closed-door briefings on Capitol Hill with the FBI and other law enforcement officials Tuesday, lawmakers said it appeared that the brothers were motivated by a strain of anti-American Islamic extremism, that they were radicalized via the Internet and not by any direct contact with terrorist groups, and that the older brother was the driving force in the bomb plot.

Conflicting stories appeared to emerge about which agencies knew about Tamerlan Tsarnaev’s trip to Russia last year.

Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano told a Senate panel that her agency knew about Tsarnaev’s journey to his homeland. But Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., said the FBI "told me they had no knowledge of him leaving or coming back."

Information-sharing failures between agencies prompted an overhaul of the U.S. intelligence system after 9/11.

Sen. Saxby Chambliss, R-Ga., vice chairman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said it doesn’t appear yet that anyone "dropped the ball." But he said he was asking all the federal agencies for more information about who knew what about the suspect.

"There still seem to be serious problems with sharing information, including critical investigative information ... not only among agencies but also within the same agency in one case," said committee member Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine.

Next Page >


Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.