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FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2013 file photo, Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey takes part in news conference at the Pentagon in Washington. Dempsey traveled to Afghanistan Saturday, April 6, 2013 to meet U.S. and allied commanders and consult with Afghan officials on winding down the war. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen, File)
6 Americans, doctor killed in Afghan attacks
First Published Apr 06 2013 10:52 am • Last Updated Apr 06 2013 12:55 pm

Kandahar, Afghanistan • Militants killed six Americans and an Afghan doctor in a pair of attacks in Afghanistan on Saturday, the deadliest day for the United States in the war in eight months.

The violence — hours after the U.S. military’s top officer arrived for consultations with Afghan and U.S.-led coalition officials — illustrates the instability plaguing the nation as foreign forces work to pull nearly all their combat troops out of the country by the end of 2014.

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The attacks came just days after insurgents stormed a courthouse, killing more than 46 people in one of the deadliest attacks of the war, now in its 12th year.

Three U.S. service members, two U.S. civilians and the doctor were killed when a suicide bomber detonated a car full of explosives in the south, officials said. The explosion occurred just as a coalition convoy drove past another caravan of vehicles carrying the governor of Zabul province.

Another American civilian was killed in a separate insurgent attack in eastern Afghanistan, the U.S. military said in a statement.

It was the deadliest day for Americans since Aug. 16, when seven American service members were killed in two attacks in Kandahar province, the birthplace of the Taliban insurgency. Six were killed when their helicopter was shot down by insurgents and one soldier died in a roadside bomb explosion.

The latest attacks occurred just hours after U.S. Gen. Martin Dempsey, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, landed in Afghanistan for a visit aimed at assessing the level of training that American troops can provide to Afghan security forces after international combat forces complete their withdrawal.

The two American civilians killed included at least one U.S. State Department employee, according to a U.S. official who spoke on condition of anonymity ahead of a formal announcement. Several other Americans and Afghans, possibly as many as nine, were wounded, the official said.

The U.S. Embassy in Kabul confirmed that Americans were involved in an attack in Qalat, the capital of Zabul province, which is next to Kandahar and shares a volatile border with Pakistan.

"There are American and Afghan casualties," the embassy said in a statement. "We are still investigating the incident and cannot confirm details at this time."


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Taliban spokesman Qari Yousef Ahmadi claimed responsibility for the attack in Zabul and said the bomber was seeking to target either a coalition convoy or the governor.

"We were waiting for one of them," Ahmadi said in a telephone interview with The Associated Press. "It was our good luck that both appeared at the same time."

The deaths bring the number of foreign military troops killed this year to 30, including 22 Americans. A total of six foreign civilians have died in Afghanistan so far this year, according to an AP count.

Provincial Gov. Mohammad Ashraf Nasery, who was driving to an event at a nearby school in Qalat, said the explosion occurred in front of a hospital and a coalition base housing a provincial reconstruction team, or PRT. International civilian and military workers at the PRT train Afghan government officials and help with local development projects.

Nasery, who survived the attack, said the car bomb exploded as his convoy was passing the hospital. He said the doctor was killed, and two of his bodyguards and a student from the school were wounded.

"The governor’s convoy was at the gate of the school at the same time the (coalition) convoy came out from the PRT," said provincial police chief Gen. Ghulam Sakhi Rooghlawanay. "The suicide bomber blew himself up between the two convoys."

Nasery said he thought his convoy was the intended target.

"I’m safe and healthy," he told the AP in a telephone interview.

Insurgents have stepped up attacks around the country in recent weeks as Afghanistan enters what could be one of the most critical periods following the U.S. invasion in late 2001 that ousted the Taliban.

The majority of U.S. and coalition forces are expected to begin a significant drawdown in the latter part of this year, leaving Afghan forces in charge of security across the country within months. Afghanistan also is gearing up for a presidential election next spring, and the Taliban have not yet accepted an offer to engage in peace talks in the Gulf state of Qatar.

There currently are about 100,000 international troops in Afghanistan, including 66,000 from the United States. The U.S. troop total is scheduled to drop to about 32,000 by early next year, with the bulk of the decline occurring during the winter months.

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