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FILE - This is a combo of photos of Jared Loughner released Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2011, by the U.S. Marshal's Service. Loughner pleaded guilty in the Tucson, Ariz., shooting rampage that killed six people and left several others wounded, including then-U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords. Hundreds of pages of police reports in the investigation of the shooting were released Wednesday, March 27, 2013 marking the public's first glimpse into documents that authorities have kept private since the attack on Jan. 8, 2011. (AP Photo/U.S. Marshal's Office, File)(AP Photo/U.S. Marshal's Office)
Dad told cops Giffords’ shooter ‘doesn’t seem right lately’
First Published Mar 27 2013 02:30 pm • Last Updated Mar 27 2013 06:45 pm

Tucson, Ariz. • Major findings on the Jan. 8, 2011, attack on former Rep. Gabrielle Giffords gleaned from about 2,700 pages of documents released Wednesday, including survivor accounts, police reports and interviews with friends and family of gunman Jared Loughner:

PARENTS

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Amy Loughner described her son’s run-ins with authorities, use of marijuana and cocaine and increasingly erratic behavior. She said a drug test turned up negative. Randy Loughner said his son became more and more difficult, and it was a challenge to have a rational conversation: "I tried to talk to him. But you can’t, he wouldn’t let you. ... Lost, lost, and just didn’t want to communicate with me no more." Randy Loughner said his son "just doesn’t seem right lately."

TALKED TO SELF

Despite the bizarre behavior and his school’s recommendation he undergo a mental health evaluation, the parents didn’t seek help. Loughner, who was ultimately diagnosed with schizophrenia, often talked to himself in the year before the shooting and even laughed during the conversations, which weren’t angry or about hurting anyone, his mother said. "And sometimes he would look like he was having a conversation with someone right there. Be talking to someone. I don’t know how to explain it. I don’t."

SCHOOL VIDEO

Hours after the shooting, Randy Loughner mentioned a video that caused Pima Community College to expel his son. "They didn’t like his video. ‘Cause, he’s always, his First Amendment rights. He’s, uh, he’s too intelligent. You know? And they, and it, and they, they dismissed him from school. Told him he needed to go see, seek medical help to come back to school. ... He felt that the pigs were out to get him."

FIRED FROM JOB

The father considered his son’s firing as a salesman at an Eddie Bauer store to be a turning point: "He just wasn’t the same. He just, nothing, nothing worked, seem to go right for him."

SHOTGUN


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Loughner bought a 12-gauge shotgun in 2008, but his parents took it away from him after he was expelled.

HANDGUN PURCHASE

One-time Loughner friend Zachary Osler was an employee at a store where Loughner bought a Glock 9 mm handgun with a 15-round magazine in November 2010. Loughner had a military style haircut and cleared all background checks. He used a Visa card to pay the $559 for the gun and a box of ammo.

GUN STORE JOB

Osler remembered Loughner coming into the gun store on at least two occasions in the previous year, including once to apply for a job, for which he was denied. Osler said hello during one of the visits, but Loughner didn’t acknowledge or look at him and just continued onward.

DREAMS

Osler told investigators he had grown uncomfortable with Loughner’s personality. "He would say he could dream and then control what he was doing while he was dreaming."

HOME LIFE

Osler told investigators Loughner’s parents drank heavily and he didn’t get along with his father. "A lot of the times I’d be over there his dad would be yellin’ at him about whatever. Kind of a somewhat hostile environment. I never really felt comfortable over there," Osler said.

PISTOL IN WAIST

A few weeks before the shooting, Loughner showed up at the apartment of boyhood friend Anthony Kuck with a 9 mm pistol in his waistband. Loughner said he bought the gun for Christmas for "home protection." Kuck’s roommate, Derek Heintz, said Loughner left a bullet as a souvenir. Kuck said he had seen Loughner deteriorate over time: problems with drinking in high school, trouble with police, being kicked out of college, then showing up with a shaved head, bullet tattoos on his shoulder and a gun. "I just know his personality is not normal."

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