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Senate Democratic budget extends standoff with GOP


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In a rebuke to one of the Senate’s most conservative members, they overwhelmingly rejected a proposal by Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., to cut even deeper than the House GOP budget and eliminate deficits in just five years.

The Democratic budget’s $975 billion in new taxes would be matched by an equal amount of spending reductions coming chiefly from health programs, defense and reduced interest payments as deficits get smaller than previously anticipated.

At a glance

White House praises Senate-passed budget

The White House is praising the $3.7 trillion budget Democrats squeezed through the Senate early Saturday.

But spokesman Jay Carney isn’t raising too much hope for compromise with the GOP-led House, which previously passed a competing budget that makes deep cuts to social programs.

Carney says in a statement issued Saturday morning that the House budget — quote— “refuses to ask for a single dime of deficit reduction from closing tax loopholes for the wealthy and well-connected.”

He adds that President Barack Obama will work with both sides to see if there is an opportunity to reach a deal.

Although his major proposals are well-known, Obama has not yet released his budget for the coming year. That’s expected in early April.

Senate and House budget proposals compared

How the budget proposals by Senate Democrats and House Republicans stack up over the next decade:

———

Total spending

Senate Democrats » $46.5 trillion

House Republicans » $41.7 trillion

———

Total revenue

Senate Democrats » $41.2 trillion

House Republicans » $40.2 trillion

———

10-year deficit

Senate Democrats » $5.4 trillion

House Republicans » $1.4 trillion

———

National debt at end of 2023

Senate Democrats » $24.4 trillion

House Republicans » $20.3 trillion

———

Social Security

Senate Democrats » $11.3 trillion

House Republicans » $11.3 trillion

———

Medicare

Senate Democrats » $6.8 trillion

House Republicans » $6.7 trillion

———

Health, including Medicaid and the State Children’s Health Insurance Program

Senate Democrats » $6.6 trillion

House Republicans » $4.0 trillion

———

National defense

Senate Democrats » $6.0 trillion

House Republicans » $6.2 trillion

———

Income security, including housing assistance, cash benefits and food stamps

Senate Democrats » $5.6 trillion

House Republicans » $5.0 trillion

———

Interest on national debt

Senate Democrats » $5.2 trillion

House Republicans » $4.5 trillion

———

Veterans benefits and services

Senate Democrats » $1.7 trillion

House Republicans » $1.7 trillion

———

International Affairs, including foreign aid

Senate Democrats » $506 billion

House Republicans » $431 billion

———

Education, training, employment and social services

Senate Democrats » $1.1 trillion

House Republicans » $906 billion

———

Transportation

Senate Democrats » $919 billion

House Republicans » $801 billion

———

Agriculture

Senate Democrats » $205 billion

House Republicans » $196 billion

———

Natural resources and environment

Senate Democrats » $474 billion

House Republicans » $385 billion

———

Community and regional development

Senate Democrats » $268 billion

House Republicans » $88 billion

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This year’s projected deficit of nearly $900 billion would fall to around $700 billion next year and bottom out near $400 billion in 2016 before trending upward again.

Shoehorned into the package is $100 billion for public works projects and other programs aimed at creating jobs.

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Associated Press writer Andrew Taylor contributed to this report.

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Follow Alan Fram on Twitter: https://twitter.com/asfram




Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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