Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts

Shell casings may tie Texas shootout to Colorado death
First Published Mar 22 2013 01:50 pm • Last Updated Mar 22 2013 03:55 pm

Shell casings from a shootout with a white supremacist Colorado parolee in Texas are the same make and caliber as those found at the home of Colorado’s prison chief after he was killed.

The information comes from an application to search the wrecked car of Evan Spencer Ebel, who was killed in Thursday’s shootout with Texas law enforcement.

Photos
Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

Authorities also say they found a Domino’s pizza bag and a jacket or shirt in the car’s trunk. Denver Police say Ebel is a suspect in Sunday’s killing of pizza delivery man Nathan Leon.

Ebel fired at Texas authorities who tried to stop him Thursday. His car matched the description of the one that was spotted outside the home of Colorado Corrections director Tom Clements just before his death.

THIS IS A BREAKING NEWS UPDATE. Check back soon for further information. AP’s earlier story is below.

A former Colorado inmate and white supremacist at the center of a two-state mystery is dead after a high-speed chase and shootout with Texas deputies. Now investigators are trying to piece together whether he killed the chief of Colorado prisons and a pizza delivery man, where he was headed when Texas police stopped him.

Evan Spencer Ebel, 28, is a Colorado parolee with a long record of convictions since 2003 for various crimes including assaulting a prison guard in 2008. He was a member of a white supremacist prison gang called the 211s, a federal law enforcement official told The Associated Press. The official was not authorized to speak publicly about the case and spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity.

Colorado officials would not confirm Ebel’s gang ties or say whether they had anything to do with the death of prisons director Tom Clements. But they said that, since the Tuesday night killing, state troopers have provided extra security for Colorado government officials.

"We are at a heightened alert," said Steve Johnson of the Colorado Bureau of Investigation at a Friday news conference here.

Denver police said they were "confident" he was also involved in the death of Nathan Leon, 27, the pizza man whose body was found Sunday.


story continues below
story continues below

The FBI and local officials were also beginning to examine another case that appears similar to the Clements killing — the Jan. 31 slaying of a prosecutor in Kaufman — about 100 miles from where Ebel crashed and got into the shootout. Mark Hasse was gunned down as he walked across a parking lot to the courthouse.

Authorities have investigated whether Hasse’s death could be linked to a white supremacist gang. On Friday they said they will see if there is any connection to Clements’ murder.

"This is part of routine investigative work when two crimes occur under somewhat similar circumstances," Kaufman County Lt. Justin Miller said in a statement on the look at any links with the Clements case.

Ebel’s tie to Clements’ killing comes from the car he drove — a black Cadillac with mismatched Colorado plates that fit the description of a vehicle spotted outside Clements’ home just before the prison chief answered his front door and was shot to death.

Texas authorities spotted the car Thursday and gave chase after Ebel shot and wounded a deputy. They fatally shot him after he crashed into a semi and opened fire on his pursuers.

Ebel is not on the radar of the Southern Poverty Law Center, which tracks extremist groups, but the center rates the gang as one of the most vicious white supremacist groups operating in the nation’s prisons, comparable to the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas. Founded in 1995 to protect white prisoners from attacks, it operates only in Colorado and has anywhere from between a couple hundred to 1,000 members, senior fellow Mark Potok said Friday.

The gang has grown into a sophisticated criminal enterprise where members are assigned military titles like "general" and extort money from fellow prisoners, regardless of race. Released members are expected to make money to support those still in prison, Potok said. He said members have to attack someone to get in and can only get out by dying.

"It’s blood in and blood out," he said.

In 2005, 32 members were indicted for racketeering and the gang’s founder, Benjamin Davis, was sentenced to over 100 years in prison.

The killing of Clements, 58, shocked his quiet neighborhood in Monument, a town of rolling hills north of Colorado Springs, for its brutality: He answered the door of his home Tuesday evening and was gunned down. Authorities wouldn’t say if they thought the attack was related to his job, and all Clements’ recent public activities and cases were scrutinized.

The Texas car chase started when a sheriff’s deputy in Montague County, James Boyd, tried to pull over the Cadillac around 11 a.m. Thursday, authorities there said. They wouldn’t say exactly why he was stopped, but called it routine.

Next Page >


Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Login to the Electronic Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.