Quantcast
Get breaking news alerts via email

Click here to manage your alerts

Cardinals celebrate Mass before entering conclave
First Published Mar 12 2013 09:00 am • Last Updated Mar 12 2013 01:10 pm

VATICAN CITY • Cardinals heard a final appeal for unity Tuesday before sequestering themselves in the Sistine Chapel for the conclave to elect the next pope, as they celebrated Mass amid divisions and uncertainty over who will lead the 1.2 billion-strong Catholic Church and tend to its many problems.

Gregorian chant echoed through St. Peter’s Basilica as the 115 cardinal electors filed in wearing bright red vestments, many looking grim as if the burden of the imminent vote was weighing on them.

Join the Discussion
Post a Comment

A few hundred people braved thunderstorms and pouring rain to watch the Mass on giant TV screens in St. Peter’s Square. A handful knelt in prayer, eyes clenched and hands clasped.

In his homily, Cardinal Angelo Sodano, dean of the College of Cardinals, called for unity within the church, a not-so-veiled appeal to the cardinal electors to put their differences aside for the good of the church and the next pope.

"Each of us is therefore called to cooperate with the Successor of Peter, the visible foundation of such an ecclesial unity," Sodano said. He said the job of pope is to be merciful, charitable and "tirelessly promote justice and peace."

He was interrupted by applause from the pews — not so much from the cardinals — when he referred to the "beloved and venerated" Benedict XVI and his "brilliant" pontificate. Sitting in the front row was Benedict’s longtime aide, Archbishop Georg Gaenswein.

Benedict’s surprise resignation — the first in 600 years by a pope — has thrown the church into turmoil and exposed the deep divisions among cardinals who are grappling with whether they need a manager who can clean up the Vatican’s dysfunctional bureaucracy or a pastor who can inspire Catholics at a time of waning faith.

For over a week, they met behind closed doors to try to figure out who among them had the stuff to be pope and what his priorities should be. But they ended the debate on Monday with questions still unanswered and many cardinals predicting a drawn-out election that will further expose the church’s divisions.

"Let us pray for the cardinals who are to elect the Roman pontiff," read one of the prayers during the Mass. "May the Lord fill them with his Holy Spirit with understanding and good counsel, wisdom and discernment."

In his final radio address before being sequestered, U.S. Cardinal Timothy Dolan on Tuesday said a certain calm had taken hold over him, as if "this gentle Roman rain is a sign of the grace of the Holy Spirit coming upon us."


story continues below
story continues below

He said he at least felt more settled about the task at hand. "And there’s a sense of resignation and conformity with God’s plan. It’s magnificent," he said during his regular radio show on "The Catholic Channel" on SiriusXM.

"It’s almost a microcosm of life itself, you know how you try to make the right decisions in conformity with God’s holy will. And I think that’s what’s happening now. I just hope I see you soon."

One of the faithful outside alluded to the huge challenge facing the next pontiff.

"It’s a moment of crisis for the church so we have to show support of the new pope," said Veronica Herrera, a real estate agent from Mexico who traveled to Rome for the conclave with her husband and daughter.

Yet the mood was not entirely somber or reverent.

A group of women who say they are priests launched pink smoke from a balcony overlooking the square during the Mass to demand female ordination — a play on the famous smoke signals that will tell the world whether a pope has been elected. The Femen group of women activists, several of whom have gone topless in St. Peter’s to protest the Vatican’s opposition to gay marriage, were also due to protest Tuesday.

And in a bizarre twist, basketball star Dennis Rodman is expected to arrive in St. Peter’s Square on Wednesday in a makeshift popemobile as he campaigns for Cardinal Peter Turkson of Ghana to become the church’s first black pope.

None of the cardinals will see it, since they will be sequestered inside the Vatican walls, allowed only to go from the Vatican hotel through the gardens to the Sistine Chapel and back again until they have elected a pope. No telephones, no newspapers, no television, no tweeting.

The cardinals begin this process Tuesday afternoon by filing into the frescoed Sistine Chapel singing the Litany of Saints, a hypnotic chant imploring the intercession of saints to help them choose a pope. They will hear a meditation by an elderly Maltese cardinal, take an oath of secrecy, then in all probability cast their first ballots.

Assuming they vote, the first puffs of smoke should emerge from the chapel chimney by 8 p.m. (1900 GMT; 3 p.m. EDT) — black for no pope, white if a pope has been chosen.

While few people expect a pontiff to be elected on the first ballot, the Vatican was ready: In the Room of Tears off the Sistine Chapel where the pope goes immediately after his election, three sizes of white cassocks hung from a clothes rack. Underneath, seven white shoe boxes were piled, presumably containing the various sizes of the red leather shoes that popes traditionally wear. The room gets its name from the weight of the job thrust upon the new pontiff.

Next Page >


Copyright 2014 The Salt Lake Tribune. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

Top Reader Comments Read All Comments Post a Comment
Click here to read all comments   Click here to post a comment


About Reader Comments


Reader comments on sltrib.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Salt Lake Tribune. We will delete comments containing obscenities, personal attacks and inappropriate or offensive remarks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. If you see an objectionable comment, please alert us by clicking the arrow on the upper right side of the comment and selecting "Flag comment as inappropriate". If you've recently registered with Disqus or aren't seeing your comments immediately, you may need to verify your email address. To do so, visit disqus.com/account.
See more about comments here.
Staying Connected
Videos
Jobs
Contests and Promotions
  • Search Obituaries
  • Place an Obituary

  • Search Cars
  • Search Homes
  • Search Jobs
  • Search Marketplace
  • Search Legal Notices

  • Other Services
  • Advertise With Us
  • Subscribe to the Newspaper
  • Access your e-Edition
  • Frequently Asked Questions
  • Contact a newsroom staff member
  • Access the Trib Archives
  • Privacy Policy
  • Missing your paper? Need to place your paper on vacation hold? For this and any other subscription related needs, click here or call 801.204.6100.