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Career woes, perceived racism fuel anger of ex-cop wanted in killing spree


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In the document, Dorner rails against the hypocrisy of black police commanders who crack down on their white subordinates and catalogues his experiences with racism and injustice, beginning with a schoolyard fight at his Christian elementary school and ending with the disciplinary process that led to his dismissal from the LAPD in 2008.

Dorner recalls that he beat up a fellow student who called him a racial slur on the playground while in the first grade. The principal punished the student, but also chastised Dorner for not turning the other cheek, "as Jesus did."

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At a glance

Hunt for ex-cop goes on amid snowstorm

Southern California authorities hunting a triple-murder suspect plan to search through the weekend in snow-covered mountains where the former Los Angeles police officer torched and abandoned his pickup truck.

As of noon Friday there has been no sign of Christopher Dorner, but San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon says searchers will press on unless there’s evidence Dorner has left the Big Bear Lake area.

Deputies have searched many residences and are now focusing on 200 vacant cabins in the surrounding forest.

Mayor Jay Obernolte says there’s been no panic. He says ski areas are open because there’s no substantial threat to the resorts.

Ex says Dorner was disturbed, self-obsessed

Court documents show an ex-girlfriend of a former Los Angeles police officer suspected of three murders called him “severely emotionally and mentally disturbed” after the two split in 2006.

Documents obtained by The Associated Press on Friday show ex-officer Christopher Dorner unsuccessfully requested a restraining order against his ex-girlfriend after she posted his badge number on a website called Dontdatehimgirl.com.

In the posting, Ariana Williams calls Dorner “twisted” and “super paranoid” and warns other women on the website not to date him.

Williams’ attorney didn’t return a call or email.

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"That day I made a life decisions that I will not tolerate racial derogatory terms spoken to me," he wrote.

He also recalls sticking up for a fellow cadet in the police academy when other recruits sang Hitler youth songs and taunted the man, who was the son of a Holocaust survivor, and placing another recruit in a choke hold after the man used a racial slur and refused to stop when Dorner objected.

In the latter instance, Dorner filed a complaint against two of his fellow recruits, but only one of the men was disciplined and it left him bitter, according to court records. He would later tell a colleague the LAPD was corroded by the racism of some of its officers.

Dorner graduated and served for only four months in the field before being deployed to the Middle East in 2006 and 2007. When he returned, he was assigned to a training officer, Sgt. Teresa Evans, who became increasingly alarmed at his conduct, according a summary of an interview with Evans in Dorner’s disciplinary file.

The burly man with tattoos on his biceps repeatedly asked why he was not sent to reintegration training after his return from war and on one occasion, began weeping in the patrol car and demanded to be taken back to the police academy to be retrained, court documents show.

Dorner also told Evans he was building a house in Las Vegas and intended to sue the department after his probationary period was over — a conversation Evans reported to a superior.

Evans began collecting examples of "deficiencies" in Dorner’s police work — including talking to a suspect on a "man with a gun" call without taking cover. After much prodding, Evans recounts, Dorner told her he "might have some issues regarding his deployment."

On Aug. 4, 2007, Evans warned Dorner that she would give him an unsatisfactory rating and request that he be removed from the field unless he improved.


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Six days later, Dorner reported to internal affairs that in the course of an arrest Evans had kicked a severely mentally ill man in the chest and left cheek. His report came two weeks after the arrest, police and court records allege.

Three civilian witnesses and a harbor policeman all said they didn’t see Evans kick the man, who had a quarter-inch scratch on his cheek consistent with his fall into a bush. The police review board ruled against Dorner, leading to his dismissal.

"The delay in reporting the alleged misconduct, coupled with the witnesses’ statements, irreparably destroy Dorner’s credibility and bring into question his suitability for continued employment as a police officer," the file reads.

Evans could not be reached for comment. Eric Rose, a spokesman for the Los Angeles Police Protective League, the officers’ union, declined to comment on the case or on Dorner.

As a result, he lost everything, including his relationships with his mother, sister and close friends, he wrote in his manifesto.

"Self-preservation is no longer important to me. I do not fear death as I died long ago," he writes. "I was told by my mother that sometimes bad things happen to good people. I refuse to accept that."

———

Associated Press Writers Julie Watson in San Diego, Greg Risling, Linda Deutsch and Tami Abdollah in Los Angeles and researchers Rhonda Shafner and Susan James in New York contributed to this report.

Key events in hunt for Christopher Dorner

Key events involving Christopher Dorner, the fired Los Angeles police officer suspected of killing at least three people, including a police officer in Southern California, and posting a manifesto on Facebook outlining plans to kill the families of those he felt wronged him:

— Sunday, Feb. 3: Monica Quan, 28, and Keith Lawrence, 27, are found shot to death in their car at an Irvine, Calif., parking structure. Quan, an assistant women’s basketball coach at California State University, Fullerton, was the daughter of a former Los Angeles police captain who represented Dorner in disciplinary hearings that resulted in his dismissal.

— Monday, Feb. 4, about 9:30 a.m. PST: Some of Dorner’s belongings, including police equipment, are found in a trash bin in the San Diego-area community of National City.

— Monday, Feb. 4 through Wednesday, Feb. 6: Police find a scrap of paper that mentions names associated with the LAPD. LAPD is contacted, and when they see a connection to Randal Quan, who lost his daughter the day prior, Irvine Police Department is called. Authorities find Dorner’s manifesto online.

— Wednesday, Feb. 6: Irvine police say they are looking for Dorner as a suspect in the killings of Quan and Lawrence, and that he implicated himself in the killings in the manifesto posted on Facebook. U.S. marshals and other law enforcement officials, acting on a credible lead, search Wednesday night for Dorner in San Diego’s Point Loma area.

— Wednesday, Feb. 6, 10:30 p.m.: A man matching Dorner’s description tries to steal a 47-foot boat from a San Diego marina, but the engine won’t start. An 81-year-old man on the boat is tied up but unhurt.

— Thursday, Feb. 7, 1:30 a.m.: In the Riverside County community of Corona, Calif., two LAPD officers assigned to protect a person named in the manifesto chase a vehicle they believe is Dorner’s. One officer is grazed in the forehead during a shootout, and the gunman flees. A short time later, a gunman believed to be Dorner ambushes two Riverside police officers who had stopped at a red light during a routine patrol. One officer is killed, and the other critically injured.

— Thursday, Feb. 7, 2:18 a.m.: A shuttle bus driver turns in a wallet with an LAPD badge and a picture ID of Dorner to San Diego police. The wallet is found less than five miles from the boat, near San Diego International Airport.

— Thursday, Feb. 7, 5:15 a.m.: LAPD officers guarding a manifesto target in the Los Angeles suburb of Torrance open fire on a truck they mistakenly believe to be Dorner’s. Two women are wounded. A short time later, Torrance police are involved in a second shooting involving a different truck they also mistake for Dorner’s. Nobody is hurt.

— Thursday, Feb. 7, 8:30 a.m.: Reports surface that authorities are investigating a burned pickup truck near the Big Bear ski area in the San Bernardino Mountains. A San Bernardino County sheriff’s deputy says there have been no sightings of Dorner, but local school officials decide to put campuses in lockdown.

— Thursday, Feb. 7, 9:30 a.m.: Authorities in central and northern Arizona are alerted about the manhunt for Dorner along with a description of a vehicle he may be driving.

— Thursday, Feb. 7, 9:40 a.m.: Naval Base Point Loma in San Diego is locked down after a Navy worker reports seeing someone who resembles Dorner. Two hours later, Navy officials say they don’t believe Dorner was on base.

— Thursday, Feb. 7, 2:30 p.m.: Authorities confirm the pickup truck found near Bear Mountain ski area at Big Bear Lake belongs to Dorner.

— Thursday, Feb. 7, 3:30 p.m.: San Bernardino County Sheriff John McMahon announces a door-to-door search for Dorner is under way.

— Thursday, Feb. 7, 4 p.m.: FBI SWAT teams and local police serve a search warrant at a Las Vegas-area home belonging to Dorner. Authorities leave with boxes of items from the two-story house but decline to disclose what has been found.



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