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FILE - This Dec. 3, 2012 file photo shows Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Sen. John Kerry, D-Mass., at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Kerry stands tall as President Barack Obama's good soldier. The lawmaker from Massachusetts has quietly jetted off to Afghanistan and Pakistan numerous times to tamp down diplomatic disputes that threatened to explode in the administration's face, spending hours on tea and walks with Afghan President Hamid Karzai or delicate negotiations in Islamabad. It's a highly unusual role for a Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman: envoy without a specific portfolio. Kerry has pushed the White House's national security agenda in the Senate, with mixed results. He successfully ensured ratification of a nuclear arms reduction treaty in 2010 and most recently failed to convince Republicans to back a U.N. pact on the rights of persons with disabilities. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
On foreign policy, Kerry is Obama’s good soldier
First Published Dec 16 2012 11:01 am • Last Updated Dec 16 2012 05:14 pm

Washington » Democratic Sen. John Kerry stands tall as President Barack Obama’s good soldier.

The Massachusetts lawmaker has flown to Afghanistan and Pakistan numerous times to tamp down diplomatic disputes, spending hours drinking tea and taking walks with Afghan President Hamid Karzai or engaging in delicate negotiations in Islamabad.

At a glance

Sen. John Kerry

Name » John Forbes Kerry.

Age, birth date » 69; Dec. 11, 1943.

Education » Bachelor’s degree, political science, Yale University, 1966; law degree, Boston College, 1976.

Experience » U.S. Senate, 1985-present; unsuccessful Democratic candidate for president, 2004; Massachusetts lieutenant governor, 1983-1985; lawyer in private practice, 1979-1982; Middlesex County, Mass., prosecutor, 1976-1978; spokesman, Vietnam Veterans Against the War, 1971; Navy officer, awarded Silver Star, Bronze Star with Combat “V,” three Purple Hearts for Vietnam War service, 1966-1970.

Family » Wife, Teresa Heinz; two children, three stepchildren, two grandchildren.

Quote » “I’ve known and worked closely with Susan Rice not just at the U.N., but in my own campaign for president. I’ve defended her publicly and wouldn’t hesitate to do so again because I know her character and I know her commitment. She’s an extraordinarily capable and dedicated public servant.”

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It’s a highly unusual role for a Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman: envoy with a special but undefined portfolio.

Kerry has pushed the White House’s national security agenda in the Senate with mixed results. He successfully ensured ratification of a nuclear arms reduction treaty in 2010 and most recently failed to persuade Republicans to back a U.N. pact on the rights of the disabled.

Throughout this past election year, he skewered Obama’s Republican rival, Mitt Romney, at nearly every opportunity and was a vocal booster for the president’s re-election. Kerry memorably told delegates at the Democratic National Convention in August: "Ask Osama bin Laden if he’s better off now than he was four years ago."

Obama seems likely to reward all that work by nominating the 69-year-old Kerry, perhaps in the coming days, to succeed Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton as the nation’s top diplomat. The prospects for the five-term senator soared last week when U.N. Ambassador Susan Rice, a top contender for the post, withdrew from consideration to avoid a fierce fight with Senate Republicans.

A Kerry nomination has been discussed with congressional leaders, and consultations between the White House and congressional Democrats have centered on the fate of his Senate seat, according to officials familiar with the situation who were not authorized to publicly discuss the talks. If the seat were in play, it could boost the prospects for recently defeated Republican Sen. Scott Brown to win back a job in Washington.

At the same time, Obama is considering one of Kerry’s former Senate colleagues, Republican Chuck Hagel of Nebraska, for the Pentagon’s top job.

The selection of Kerry would close a political circle with Obama. In 2004, it was White House hopeful Kerry who asked a largely unknown Illinois state senator to deliver the keynote address at the Democratic convention in Boston, handing the national stage to Obama. Kerry lost that election to President George W. Bush. Four years later, Obama was the White House hopeful who succeeded where Kerry had failed.

Senate colleagues in both parties say Kerry’s confirmation would be swift and near certain, another remarkable turnaround. Eight years ago, the GOP ridiculed Kerry as a wind-surfing, flip-flopper as he tried and failed to unseat Bush.


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"If he is nominated, he comes into the position with a world of knowledge. He’s someone who certainly understands how the legislative process works and I think he will be someone that Congress will want to work with in a very positive way," said Sen. Bob Corker of Tennessee, who is poised to become the top Republican on the Foreign Relations Committee next year.

Sen. Kelly Ayotte, R-N.H., a member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, said "there’s no question he has a very strong depth of knowledge of these issues. Certainly qualified."

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., has taken to jokingly referring to Kerry as "Mr. Secretary."

Kerry and McCain, defeated presidential candidates who returned to the Senate, have joined forces repeatedly during the past few decades. In July 1995, the two decorated Vietnam War veterans provided political cover to President Bill Clinton when he normalized U.S. relations with Vietnam. Clinton had been dogged by questions about his lack of military service.

Last year, Kerry and McCain were outspoken in pushing for a no-fly zone over Libya as Moammar Gadhafi’s forces attacked rebels and citizens. This month, they stood together in arguing for the disabilities treaty against staunch Republican opposition and complaints that it could undermine U.S. national sovereignty.

The pact fell five votes short of ratification, and Kerry called it "one of the saddest days I’ve seen" in his years in the Senate.

"Today I understand better than ever before why Americans have such disdain for Congress and just how much must happen to fix the Senate so we can act on the real interests of our country," he said, his frustration evident.

Kerry has traveled extensively for the administration, to Afghanistan in May as a strategic partnership agreement loomed large in the decade-plus war. He was in Pakistan last year in the midst of a diplomatic crisis after Raymond Davis, a CIA-contracted American spy, was accused of the killing two Pakistanis.

Sen. Chris Coons, D-Del., a member of the Foreign Relations Committee, traveled to Pakistan around that time and recalled Kerry’s influence.

"I arrived in Islamabad I think five days after Ray Davis had been taken into a jail in the Punjab and was at very real risk of being hauled out of the jail and lynched," Coons said. "Sen. Kerry was about to show up and negotiate on behalf of the administration. And it was clear that both the diplomats and the military folks we met with viewed him as a real man of credibility and experience who was likely to contribute meaningfully to those negotiations."

Davis pleaded self-defense. After weeks of wrangling between the U.S. and Pakistan, he was released in exchange for "blood money" paid to the dead men’s relatives.

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